Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Incorporating uncertainty in national-level climate change-mitigation policy: possible elements for a research agenda

Incorporating uncertainty in national-level climate change-mitigation policy: possible elements... Decision making for climate change management seldom incorporates uncertainty in the analysis that underpins the policy process. First, uncertainty is seldom characterised fully, and attempts to reduce uncertainty—when this is possible—are rare. Second, scientists are ill-equipped to communicate about uncertainty with policy makers, and policy makers most often favour pretended certainty over nuance and detail. Third, the uncertainty analysis that may have been conducted most often fails to actually influence policy in a significant manner. The case is made for (i) characterising and, to the extent possible, reducing uncertainty, (ii) communicating uncertainty, and (iii) reflecting uncertainty in the design of policy initiatives for climate change management. Possible elements for a research agenda on each of these areas are proposed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences Springer Journals

Incorporating uncertainty in national-level climate change-mitigation policy: possible elements for a research agenda

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/incorporating-uncertainty-in-national-level-climate-change-mitigation-ACWWdVBPQ3

References (29)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by AESS
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Sustainable Development
ISSN
2190-6483
eISSN
2190-6491
DOI
10.1007/s13412-018-0514-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Decision making for climate change management seldom incorporates uncertainty in the analysis that underpins the policy process. First, uncertainty is seldom characterised fully, and attempts to reduce uncertainty—when this is possible—are rare. Second, scientists are ill-equipped to communicate about uncertainty with policy makers, and policy makers most often favour pretended certainty over nuance and detail. Third, the uncertainty analysis that may have been conducted most often fails to actually influence policy in a significant manner. The case is made for (i) characterising and, to the extent possible, reducing uncertainty, (ii) communicating uncertainty, and (iii) reflecting uncertainty in the design of policy initiatives for climate change management. Possible elements for a research agenda on each of these areas are proposed.

Journal

Journal of Environmental Studies and SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 6, 2018

There are no references for this article.