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Individual risk factors of feelings of unsafety in later life

Individual risk factors of feelings of unsafety in later life The aim of this contribution is twofold: on one hand to examine the individual risk factors regarding feelings of unsafety among older people and on the other hand to investigate whether they differ between third-age adults (aged 60–79) and fourth-age adults (aged 80+). This study seeks to identify the relationship between demographic variables, lack of economic resources, well-being and perceived ageism on the one side and feelings of unsafety on the other. On the basis of data from the Belgian Ageing Studies (N = 26,116), it was found that fourth-age adults experienced higher levels of feelings of unsafety than third-age adults. Furthermore, hierarchical regression models indicated that gender, number of children and perceived ageism were significantly related to feelings of unsafety across the third and fourth ages. However, several individual characteristics were found to be specific to the different age groups. Conclusively, practical implications and research issues are critically discussed by emphasising the importance of tackling structural inequalities among older persons to reduce their feelings of unsafety. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Ageing Springer Journals

Individual risk factors of feelings of unsafety in later life

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References (46)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Social Sciences; Aging; Demography; Geriatrics/Gerontology; Public Health; Psychology, general
ISSN
1613-9372
eISSN
1613-9380
DOI
10.1007/s10433-012-0226-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The aim of this contribution is twofold: on one hand to examine the individual risk factors regarding feelings of unsafety among older people and on the other hand to investigate whether they differ between third-age adults (aged 60–79) and fourth-age adults (aged 80+). This study seeks to identify the relationship between demographic variables, lack of economic resources, well-being and perceived ageism on the one side and feelings of unsafety on the other. On the basis of data from the Belgian Ageing Studies (N = 26,116), it was found that fourth-age adults experienced higher levels of feelings of unsafety than third-age adults. Furthermore, hierarchical regression models indicated that gender, number of children and perceived ageism were significantly related to feelings of unsafety across the third and fourth ages. However, several individual characteristics were found to be specific to the different age groups. Conclusively, practical implications and research issues are critically discussed by emphasising the importance of tackling structural inequalities among older persons to reduce their feelings of unsafety.

Journal

European Journal of AgeingSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 22, 2012

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