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Inflammation-induced cancer: crosstalk between tumours, immune cells and microorganisms

Inflammation-induced cancer: crosstalk between tumours, immune cells and microorganisms Inflammation is causally related to cancer development, through processes that involve genotoxicity, aberrant tissue repair, proliferative responses, invasion and metastasis. Major inflammatory pathways that are involved in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis converge at the level of the transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Tumours modulate the inflammatory environment by the secretion of soluble growth factors and chemoattractants, which render inflammatory cells suppressive against anticancer T cell responses. In around 20% of all cases, microbial organisms are the causative agents of cancer-inducing inflammation. In addition to bona fide pathogens, pathobionts of the commensal microbiota have recently been recognized as being involved in inflammatory processes that promote tumour growth. A better understanding of the role of the microbiota in inflammation-induced cancer might prospectively lead to targeted antimicrobial therapies against cancer initiation or progression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Cancer Springer Journals

Inflammation-induced cancer: crosstalk between tumours, immune cells and microorganisms

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References (166)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Cancer Research
ISSN
1474-175X
eISSN
1474-1768
DOI
10.1038/nrc3611
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inflammation is causally related to cancer development, through processes that involve genotoxicity, aberrant tissue repair, proliferative responses, invasion and metastasis. Major inflammatory pathways that are involved in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis converge at the level of the transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Tumours modulate the inflammatory environment by the secretion of soluble growth factors and chemoattractants, which render inflammatory cells suppressive against anticancer T cell responses. In around 20% of all cases, microbial organisms are the causative agents of cancer-inducing inflammation. In addition to bona fide pathogens, pathobionts of the commensal microbiota have recently been recognized as being involved in inflammatory processes that promote tumour growth. A better understanding of the role of the microbiota in inflammation-induced cancer might prospectively lead to targeted antimicrobial therapies against cancer initiation or progression.

Journal

Nature Reviews CancerSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 24, 2013

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