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Intergroup Relationships in Western Black-and-White Colobus, Colobus polykomos polykomos

Intergroup Relationships in Western Black-and-White Colobus, Colobus polykomos polykomos We investigated patterns of intergroup relationships in western black-and-white colobus, Colobus polykomos, in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, between 1993 and 1999. They live in one-male multifemale units, and demonstrate male dispersal and occasional dispersal by females. Solitary males and all-male bands are absent or very rare. Our aim was to investigate the function of female and male aggression during intergroup interactions. The species is particularly interesting because, in contrast to predictions from socioecological models, female aggression occurs during intergroup interactions in combination with female dispersal. Home ranges of neighboring groups overlapped considerably and groups lacked an area of exclusive access. Intergroup interactions occurred once every 6.6 observation days. Encounters were either peaceful (12%), or involved displays and threats (25%) or chases and fights (63%). Females interacted in 74% and males in 98% of aggressive intergroup encounters. We found little to no indication that male and female aggression correlated with the presence of food, importance of a location, or presence of infants or receptive females. However, females were more often aggressive during the months when the group depended strongly on seeds from Pentaclethra macrophylla. We also observed forays by males to other groups. Forays occurred on average once every 20 observation days. In 75% of the forays, the intruding male chased members of the target group. In 25% of the forays 1–3 females joined their male but females never attacked the target group. Our main study group was the target of such forays significantly more often when young infants were present in the group than when not. We conclude that female aggression between groups was related to food procurement and that male forays might be related to infanticide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Primatology Springer Journals

Intergroup Relationships in Western Black-and-White Colobus, Colobus polykomos polykomos

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References (69)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Evolutionary Biology; Zoology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Anthropology; Animal Ecology; Human Genetics
ISSN
0164-0291
eISSN
1573-8604
DOI
10.1007/s10764-005-8853-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigated patterns of intergroup relationships in western black-and-white colobus, Colobus polykomos, in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, between 1993 and 1999. They live in one-male multifemale units, and demonstrate male dispersal and occasional dispersal by females. Solitary males and all-male bands are absent or very rare. Our aim was to investigate the function of female and male aggression during intergroup interactions. The species is particularly interesting because, in contrast to predictions from socioecological models, female aggression occurs during intergroup interactions in combination with female dispersal. Home ranges of neighboring groups overlapped considerably and groups lacked an area of exclusive access. Intergroup interactions occurred once every 6.6 observation days. Encounters were either peaceful (12%), or involved displays and threats (25%) or chases and fights (63%). Females interacted in 74% and males in 98% of aggressive intergroup encounters. We found little to no indication that male and female aggression correlated with the presence of food, importance of a location, or presence of infants or receptive females. However, females were more often aggressive during the months when the group depended strongly on seeds from Pentaclethra macrophylla. We also observed forays by males to other groups. Forays occurred on average once every 20 observation days. In 75% of the forays, the intruding male chased members of the target group. In 25% of the forays 1–3 females joined their male but females never attacked the target group. Our main study group was the target of such forays significantly more often when young infants were present in the group than when not. We conclude that female aggression between groups was related to food procurement and that male forays might be related to infanticide.

Journal

International Journal of PrimatologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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