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Italian Women Filmmakers and the Gendered ScreenGrotesque Bodies, Fragmented Selves

Italian Women Filmmakers and the Gendered Screen: Grotesque Bodies, Fragmented Selves [Lina Wertmüller’s now classic 1970s films might seem the quintessential incarnation of feminist Claire Johnston’s call for a women’s political countercinema operating within the codes of the traditionally patriarchal entertainment film.1 The Italian filmmaker has in fact repeatedly proclaimed her lifelong love affair with popular cinema. “My greatest desire is to make popular cinema,” Wertmüller states in a 1976 interview with Paul McIsaac and Gina Blumenfeld,2 while a year later, in a conversation with Gideon Bachmann, she specifies, “I have made a decision for popular work because I have chosen a form that should reach as far as possible.”3 Simultaneously, her films of the time—Love and Anarchy, Swept Away, and Seven Beauties in particular—deal with issues dear to feminism, such as women’s social roles, and rights and gender power relations.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Italian Women Filmmakers and the Gendered ScreenGrotesque Bodies, Fragmented Selves

Part of the Italian and Italian American Studies Book Series
Editors: Cantini, Maristella

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-46352-7
Pages
33 –52
DOI
10.1057/9781137336514_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Lina Wertmüller’s now classic 1970s films might seem the quintessential incarnation of feminist Claire Johnston’s call for a women’s political countercinema operating within the codes of the traditionally patriarchal entertainment film.1 The Italian filmmaker has in fact repeatedly proclaimed her lifelong love affair with popular cinema. “My greatest desire is to make popular cinema,” Wertmüller states in a 1976 interview with Paul McIsaac and Gina Blumenfeld,2 while a year later, in a conversation with Gideon Bachmann, she specifies, “I have made a decision for popular work because I have chosen a form that should reach as far as possible.”3 Simultaneously, her films of the time—Love and Anarchy, Swept Away, and Seven Beauties in particular—deal with issues dear to feminism, such as women’s social roles, and rights and gender power relations.]

Published: Nov 2, 2015

Keywords: Female Body; Female Character; Murder Plan; Patriarchal Ideology; Popular Cinema

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