Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Limits and effects of invasion by the nonindigenous wetland plant Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife): a seed bank analysis

Limits and effects of invasion by the nonindigenous wetland plant Lythrum salicaria (purple... We used seed bank analyses to investigate the role of dispersal in limiting invasion by Eurasian Lythrum salicaria within and among North American wetlands, and the changes in seed bank diversity associated with this invader. We compared the number and species composition of seedlings emerging from soil sampled in 11 uninvaded wetlands and paired uninvaded and invaded sites within 10 invaded wetlands under both seedling competition and noncompetitive conditions. Almost no L. salicaria emerged in samples from uninvaded wetlands, indicating dispersal limitation despite prodigious seed production in nearby wetlands. However L. salicaria emerged in all samples from uninvaded sites in invaded wetlands, suggesting environmental limits on establishment within invaded wetlands. Conditions that provided opportunities for seedlings to compete reduced survival of Typha spp. but not L. salicaria seedlings. However, this was due to species-specific differences in post-emergence mortality rather than response to competition. Competition did reduce seedling mass, but this effect did not differ among species. Species richness of emerging seedlings was lower for invaded than uninvaded wetlands. Lower seed bank richness may be a cause or consequence of L. salicaria invasion. Efforts to reduce seed dispersal to uninvaded wetlands would likely slow the spread of this invader. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Invasions Springer Journals

Limits and effects of invasion by the nonindigenous wetland plant Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife): a seed bank analysis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/limits-and-effects-of-invasion-by-the-nonindigenous-wetland-plant-ls0weejrLx

References (68)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Sciences; Developmental Biology
ISSN
1387-3547
eISSN
1573-1464
DOI
10.1007/s10530-004-5858-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We used seed bank analyses to investigate the role of dispersal in limiting invasion by Eurasian Lythrum salicaria within and among North American wetlands, and the changes in seed bank diversity associated with this invader. We compared the number and species composition of seedlings emerging from soil sampled in 11 uninvaded wetlands and paired uninvaded and invaded sites within 10 invaded wetlands under both seedling competition and noncompetitive conditions. Almost no L. salicaria emerged in samples from uninvaded wetlands, indicating dispersal limitation despite prodigious seed production in nearby wetlands. However L. salicaria emerged in all samples from uninvaded sites in invaded wetlands, suggesting environmental limits on establishment within invaded wetlands. Conditions that provided opportunities for seedlings to compete reduced survival of Typha spp. but not L. salicaria seedlings. However, this was due to species-specific differences in post-emergence mortality rather than response to competition. Competition did reduce seedling mass, but this effect did not differ among species. Species richness of emerging seedlings was lower for invaded than uninvaded wetlands. Lower seed bank richness may be a cause or consequence of L. salicaria invasion. Efforts to reduce seed dispersal to uninvaded wetlands would likely slow the spread of this invader.

Journal

Biological InvasionsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 18, 2004

There are no references for this article.