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Malignant histiocytosis of the intestine

Malignant histiocytosis of the intestine Four cases of malignant histiocytosis of the intestine (MHI) are described in detail, with emphasis on the clinical features and laboratory findings that may lead to a diagnosis. MHI is a rapidly progressive, usually fatal condition, which may occur in a setting of adult celiac disease or apparently spontaneously; all patients, however, have villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia of the jejunum. Characteristic symptoms are malaise, weight loss, abdominal pain, and diarrhea followed, after a period of weeks or months, by acute small intestinal obstruction, perforation, or bleeding. Because of the high mortality associated with MHI, suggestive symptomatology and investigations should, in the absence of a definitive diagnosis, lead to an urgent laparotomy with a view to chemotherapy if the diagnosis is made. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Digestive Diseases and Sciences Springer Journals

Malignant histiocytosis of the intestine

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References (18)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gastroenterology; Hepatology; Oncology; Transplant Surgery; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0163-2116
eISSN
1573-2568
DOI
10.1007/BF01333708
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Four cases of malignant histiocytosis of the intestine (MHI) are described in detail, with emphasis on the clinical features and laboratory findings that may lead to a diagnosis. MHI is a rapidly progressive, usually fatal condition, which may occur in a setting of adult celiac disease or apparently spontaneously; all patients, however, have villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia of the jejunum. Characteristic symptoms are malaise, weight loss, abdominal pain, and diarrhea followed, after a period of weeks or months, by acute small intestinal obstruction, perforation, or bleeding. Because of the high mortality associated with MHI, suggestive symptomatology and investigations should, in the absence of a definitive diagnosis, lead to an urgent laparotomy with a view to chemotherapy if the diagnosis is made.

Journal

Digestive Diseases and SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 6, 2005

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