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Mistletoe seed dispersal by a marsupial

Mistletoe seed dispersal by a marsupial The temperate forest that extends from 35° S to 55° S along the Pacific rim of southern South America is home to an endemic and threatened flora and fauna 1 . Many species belong to lineages that can be traced back to ancient Gondwanaland 2,3 , and there are some unusual interactions between plants and animals. Here we describe an exclusive association that involves the dispersal of the sticky seeds of a mistletoe by a marsupial, Dromiciops australis, endemic to this region — a task previously thought to be carried out exclusively by birds. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Mistletoe seed dispersal by a marsupial

Nature , Volume 408 (6815) – Dec 21, 2000

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References (10)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Macmillan Magazines Ltd.
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/35050170
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The temperate forest that extends from 35° S to 55° S along the Pacific rim of southern South America is home to an endemic and threatened flora and fauna 1 . Many species belong to lineages that can be traced back to ancient Gondwanaland 2,3 , and there are some unusual interactions between plants and animals. Here we describe an exclusive association that involves the dispersal of the sticky seeds of a mistletoe by a marsupial, Dromiciops australis, endemic to this region — a task previously thought to be carried out exclusively by birds.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 21, 2000

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