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Modelling bird communities/landscape patterns relationships in a rural area of South-Western France

Modelling bird communities/landscape patterns relationships in a rural area of South-Western France The new trends in agricultural policy in Western Europe conduct to new management problems in maintaining and utilizing biological resources. In the South-Western France, the evolution of agricultural practices occurs in two opposite ways. On one hand, the intensification of agriculture leads to simplify the landscape by hedgerows removal, grasslands ploughing and drainage for corn cultivation. On the other hand, the decreasing numbers of cattle and sheep conduct the less fertile parts of the territory to evolve into fallow. These two processes are closely linked on a same territory and important interactions exist between intensive agricultural areas and semi-natural communities. To understand the importance of these interactions and their role in ecological stability of landscapes, we use passerine bird communities as an ecological indicator. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscape Ecology Springer Journals

Modelling bird communities/landscape patterns relationships in a rural area of South-Western France

Landscape Ecology , Volume 6 (3) – May 31, 2004

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References (51)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Life Sciences; Landscape Ecology; Ecology; Nature Conservation; Landscape/Regional and Urban Planning; Sustainable Development; Environmental Management
ISSN
0921-2973
eISSN
1572-9761
DOI
10.1007/BF00130031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The new trends in agricultural policy in Western Europe conduct to new management problems in maintaining and utilizing biological resources. In the South-Western France, the evolution of agricultural practices occurs in two opposite ways. On one hand, the intensification of agriculture leads to simplify the landscape by hedgerows removal, grasslands ploughing and drainage for corn cultivation. On the other hand, the decreasing numbers of cattle and sheep conduct the less fertile parts of the territory to evolve into fallow. These two processes are closely linked on a same territory and important interactions exist between intensive agricultural areas and semi-natural communities. To understand the importance of these interactions and their role in ecological stability of landscapes, we use passerine bird communities as an ecological indicator.

Journal

Landscape EcologySpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2004

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