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MRSA-surveillance in Germany: data from the Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance System (ARS) and the mandatory surveillance of MRSA in blood

MRSA-surveillance in Germany: data from the Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance System (ARS) and... Data from the German Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance system (ARS) and statutory notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in blood cultures are presented. ARS is a voluntary laboratory-based surveillance system providing resistance data of all clinical pathogens and sample types from hospitals and ambulatory care. Statutory notification includes MRSA detected in blood and cerebrospinal fluid by microbiological laboratories. Resistance data from 2008 to 2010 and MRSA-bacteraemia incidences from 2010 are presented. From 2008 to 2010, resistance data from 70,935 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were transferred to the national health institution. MRSA proportions in hospitals and outpatient care account for 19.2% and 10.6%, respectively. In hospital care high proportions of MRSA were found in nephrological, geriatric, neurological general wards and surgical ICUs (49.4%, 45.8%, 34.2%, and 27.0%, respectively), while in community outpatient care urological practices (29.2%) account for the highest values. In both healthcare settings urinary tract samples stand out with high proportions of MRSA (hospitals, 32.9%; outpatients, 20.5%). In 2010, 3900 cases of MRSA bacteraemia were reported, accounting for an incidence of MRSA bacteraemia of 4.8/100,000 inhabitants/year. Stratification by federal states shows considerable regional differences (range, 1.0–8.3/100,000 inhabitants/year). Vulnerable areas in hospitals and outpatient care have been pointed out as subjects for further inquiries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Clinical Microbiology Infectious Diseases Springer Journals

MRSA-surveillance in Germany: data from the Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance System (ARS) and the mandatory surveillance of MRSA in blood

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References (44)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Medical Microbiology; Internal Medicine
ISSN
0934-9723
eISSN
1435-4373
DOI
10.1007/s10096-011-1511-8
pmid
22210264
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Data from the German Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance system (ARS) and statutory notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in blood cultures are presented. ARS is a voluntary laboratory-based surveillance system providing resistance data of all clinical pathogens and sample types from hospitals and ambulatory care. Statutory notification includes MRSA detected in blood and cerebrospinal fluid by microbiological laboratories. Resistance data from 2008 to 2010 and MRSA-bacteraemia incidences from 2010 are presented. From 2008 to 2010, resistance data from 70,935 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were transferred to the national health institution. MRSA proportions in hospitals and outpatient care account for 19.2% and 10.6%, respectively. In hospital care high proportions of MRSA were found in nephrological, geriatric, neurological general wards and surgical ICUs (49.4%, 45.8%, 34.2%, and 27.0%, respectively), while in community outpatient care urological practices (29.2%) account for the highest values. In both healthcare settings urinary tract samples stand out with high proportions of MRSA (hospitals, 32.9%; outpatients, 20.5%). In 2010, 3900 cases of MRSA bacteraemia were reported, accounting for an incidence of MRSA bacteraemia of 4.8/100,000 inhabitants/year. Stratification by federal states shows considerable regional differences (range, 1.0–8.3/100,000 inhabitants/year). Vulnerable areas in hospitals and outpatient care have been pointed out as subjects for further inquiries.

Journal

European Journal of Clinical Microbiology Infectious DiseasesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 31, 2011

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