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Multilevel determinants of financial toxicity in breast cancer care: perspectives of healthcare professionals and Latina survivors

Multilevel determinants of financial toxicity in breast cancer care: perspectives of healthcare... Purpose Financial toxicity is a multidimensional side effect of cancer treatment. Yet, most relevant research has focused on individual-level determinants of financial toxicity and characterized only patient perspectives. This study examined the multilevel determinants of financial toxicity from the perspectives of Latina breast cancer survivors and healthcare professionals. Methods We analyzed qualitative data from focus groups with 19 Latina breast cancer survivors and interviews with 10 healthcare professionals recruited through community partners and venues in Chicago. Results At the individual-level, the lack of knowledge and prioritization regarding financial aspects of care (e.g., costs of treatment, insurance coverage) was identified as important determinants of financial toxicity. However, healthcare professionals emphasized the need for early financial planning, while survivors prioritized survival over financial concerns immediately after diagnosis. At the interpersonal-level, social networks were identified as important platforms for disseminating information on financial resources. At the community-level, community norms and dynamics were identified as important barriers to seeking financial assistance. Access to culturally astute community-based organizations was considered one potential solution to elim- inate these barriers. At the organizational/healthcare policy-level, financial assistance programs’ restrictive eligibility criteria, lack of coverage post-treatment, limited availability, and instability were identified as major determinants of financial toxicity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Supportive Care in Cancer Springer Journals

Multilevel determinants of financial toxicity in breast cancer care: perspectives of healthcare professionals and Latina survivors

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References (60)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Oncology; Nursing; Nursing Research; Pain Medicine; Rehabilitation Medicine
ISSN
0941-4355
eISSN
1433-7339
DOI
10.1007/s00520-019-05119-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Financial toxicity is a multidimensional side effect of cancer treatment. Yet, most relevant research has focused on individual-level determinants of financial toxicity and characterized only patient perspectives. This study examined the multilevel determinants of financial toxicity from the perspectives of Latina breast cancer survivors and healthcare professionals. Methods We analyzed qualitative data from focus groups with 19 Latina breast cancer survivors and interviews with 10 healthcare professionals recruited through community partners and venues in Chicago. Results At the individual-level, the lack of knowledge and prioritization regarding financial aspects of care (e.g., costs of treatment, insurance coverage) was identified as important determinants of financial toxicity. However, healthcare professionals emphasized the need for early financial planning, while survivors prioritized survival over financial concerns immediately after diagnosis. At the interpersonal-level, social networks were identified as important platforms for disseminating information on financial resources. At the community-level, community norms and dynamics were identified as important barriers to seeking financial assistance. Access to culturally astute community-based organizations was considered one potential solution to elim- inate these barriers. At the organizational/healthcare policy-level, financial assistance programs’ restrictive eligibility criteria, lack of coverage post-treatment, limited availability, and instability were identified as major determinants of financial toxicity.

Journal

Supportive Care in CancerSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 12, 2019

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