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Native joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis

Native joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis Although historically considered to be very rare cells, native mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are actually relatively abundant in vivo Joint-resident MSCs occupy several bone and joint cavity niches including synovium, adipose tissue and synovial fluid Advanced osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with a numerical increase, but functional decline, in MSCs in regions of MRI-determined bone oedema, suggesting direct involvement of MSCs in OA pathology in vivo The expression of CD271 (also known as low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor) on native bone marrow-resident MSCs might be important in pathological bone changes following anti-nerve growth factor therapy In experimental models, there is strong evidence for the involvement of synovium-derived MSCs in cartilage repair following joint injury Emerging features of joint-resident MSCs suggests the potential for their use in the development of single-stage therapy to treat large cartilage defects in patients with OA http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Rheumatology Springer Journals

Native joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis

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References (116)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Rheumatology
ISSN
1759-4790
eISSN
1759-4804
DOI
10.1038/nrrheum.2017.182
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although historically considered to be very rare cells, native mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are actually relatively abundant in vivo Joint-resident MSCs occupy several bone and joint cavity niches including synovium, adipose tissue and synovial fluid Advanced osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with a numerical increase, but functional decline, in MSCs in regions of MRI-determined bone oedema, suggesting direct involvement of MSCs in OA pathology in vivo The expression of CD271 (also known as low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor) on native bone marrow-resident MSCs might be important in pathological bone changes following anti-nerve growth factor therapy In experimental models, there is strong evidence for the involvement of synovium-derived MSCs in cartilage repair following joint injury Emerging features of joint-resident MSCs suggests the potential for their use in the development of single-stage therapy to treat large cartilage defects in patients with OA

Journal

Nature Reviews RheumatologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 9, 2017

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