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Non-contact determination of vital sign alterations in hypovolaemic states induced by massive haemorrhage: An experimental attempt to monitor the condition of injured persons behind barriers or under disaster rubble

Non-contact determination of vital sign alterations in hypovolaemic states induced by massive... To assess a non-contact method to determine the physical alteration of human subjects confined behind a barrier or under disaster rubble, an experimental, non-contact monitoring system was tested on rabbits in a hypovolaemic state. New Zealand male rabbits behind a barrier were subjected to hypovolaemic shock induced by the withdrawal of arterial blood (2ml per 100g body weight). The hypovolaemic state was determined by linear discriminant analysis using non-contact-derived variables: heart rate X1 and respiratory rate X2. Sixteen rabbits were equally divided between the hypovolaemic and control groups. To obtain the heart and respiratory rates simultaneously, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) was performed on the 1215MHz microwave radar analogue output. The linear discriminant function calculated by non-contact-derived variables was negative in the eight hypovolaemic rabbits and positive in the eight controls, so that the linear discriminant function could distinguish the hypovolaemic group from the control group. The Mahalanobis D-square (an index for classification accuracy) was 5908; the classification error rate corresponding to this value was small and negligible. The hypovolaemic rabbits developed metabolic acidosis (HCO3 − 18.6±11.1mmoll−1 and pH 7.15±0.18 in arterial blood). The systolic blood pressure of the hypovolaemic group and the control was 56±4 and 83±6 mmHg, respectively (p<0.01). The proposed method appears promising for applications to monitor the condition of human subjects behind barriers or under disaster rubble. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing Springer Journals

Non-contact determination of vital sign alterations in hypovolaemic states induced by massive haemorrhage: An experimental attempt to monitor the condition of injured persons behind barriers or under disaster rubble

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References (16)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by IFMBE
Subject
Engineering; Human Physiology; Computer Applications; Neurosciences; Imaging / Radiology; Biomedical Engineering
ISSN
0140-0118
eISSN
1741-0444
DOI
10.1007/BF02345214
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To assess a non-contact method to determine the physical alteration of human subjects confined behind a barrier or under disaster rubble, an experimental, non-contact monitoring system was tested on rabbits in a hypovolaemic state. New Zealand male rabbits behind a barrier were subjected to hypovolaemic shock induced by the withdrawal of arterial blood (2ml per 100g body weight). The hypovolaemic state was determined by linear discriminant analysis using non-contact-derived variables: heart rate X1 and respiratory rate X2. Sixteen rabbits were equally divided between the hypovolaemic and control groups. To obtain the heart and respiratory rates simultaneously, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) was performed on the 1215MHz microwave radar analogue output. The linear discriminant function calculated by non-contact-derived variables was negative in the eight hypovolaemic rabbits and positive in the eight controls, so that the linear discriminant function could distinguish the hypovolaemic group from the control group. The Mahalanobis D-square (an index for classification accuracy) was 5908; the classification error rate corresponding to this value was small and negligible. The hypovolaemic rabbits developed metabolic acidosis (HCO3 − 18.6±11.1mmoll−1 and pH 7.15±0.18 in arterial blood). The systolic blood pressure of the hypovolaemic group and the control was 56±4 and 83±6 mmHg, respectively (p<0.01). The proposed method appears promising for applications to monitor the condition of human subjects behind barriers or under disaster rubble.

Journal

Medical & Biological Engineering & ComputingSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 22, 2006

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