Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Nursing Staff's Interpretations of “Gerotranscendental Behavior” in the Elderly

Nursing Staff's Interpretations of “Gerotranscendental Behavior” in the Elderly From the theory of gerotranscendence, certain so-called “gerotranscendental behaviors” have been derived, e.g., changes in the perception of time and the amount of time spent in solitude. In order to find out if staff members working with the elderly notice such behaviors and how they interpret them, we presented a number of caregivers with descriptions of specific behaviors (i.e., the transcendence of time). A common denominator in the interpretations of “gerotranscendental behaviors” is that they are constructed within the perspective of either a pathology-oriented or an activity-oriented theory. In the first case, the behavior is understood as a symptom of, for example, dementia. In the second case, the behavior is regarded as a negative consequence of inactivity. We conclude that, if the inherently positive developmental perspective provided by the theory of gerotranscendence is not to be lost, staff members apparently need access to new frames of reference. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aging and Identity Springer Journals

Nursing Staff's Interpretations of “Gerotranscendental Behavior” in the Elderly

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/nursing-staff-s-interpretations-of-gerotranscendental-behavior-in-the-1XDKSsDfFB
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Social Sciences; Sociology, general
ISSN
1087-3732
eISSN
1573-3491
DOI
10.1023/A:1009593330962
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From the theory of gerotranscendence, certain so-called “gerotranscendental behaviors” have been derived, e.g., changes in the perception of time and the amount of time spent in solitude. In order to find out if staff members working with the elderly notice such behaviors and how they interpret them, we presented a number of caregivers with descriptions of specific behaviors (i.e., the transcendence of time). A common denominator in the interpretations of “gerotranscendental behaviors” is that they are constructed within the perspective of either a pathology-oriented or an activity-oriented theory. In the first case, the behavior is understood as a symptom of, for example, dementia. In the second case, the behavior is regarded as a negative consequence of inactivity. We conclude that, if the inherently positive developmental perspective provided by the theory of gerotranscendence is not to be lost, staff members apparently need access to new frames of reference.

Journal

Journal of Aging and IdentitySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2004

References