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Oviposition choices by a pre-dispersal seed predator ( Hylemya sp.)

Oviposition choices by a pre-dispersal seed predator ( Hylemya sp.) Although the importance of pollinators has most often been examined in the evolution of floral characters, seed predators may also play a role in shaping floral evolution. In this study, I examined the role of interplant distance, plant size, and flower morphology on Ipomopsis aggregatás (Polemoniaceae) attractiveness to a pre-dispersal seed predator, Hylemya sp. (Anthomyiidae) and to hummingbird pollinators. The attractiveness of I. aggregata individuals to Hylemya was nonlinearly related to interplant distance in experimental arrays. Clumped and highly dispersed plants were preyed upon more frequently than those at intermediate distances. I found no relationship between interplant distance and visitation rates by hummingbird pollinators in these experimental arrays. However, in natural populations studied, clumped plants were more frequently approached by hummingbirds than those growing more widely dispersed. Display size was unrelated to visitation by Hylemya on inflorescences I clipped and maintained as “large”, “small” and “control”. Display size was also unrelated to the total number of visits by hummingbird pollinators to each of these experimental plants, however “large” display plants were more likely to be visited first in any given visitation sequence. Of various morphological measurements, corolla length showed the strongest positive correlation with Hylemya egg presence. To the extent that plant spacing and morphology is correlated with pollinator visits and ultimate seed set, Hylemya could be choosing flowers optimally, and playing a role in the evolution of floral traits. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Oviposition choices by a pre-dispersal seed predator ( Hylemya sp.)

Oecologia , Volume 91 (1) – Aug 1, 1992

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References (47)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/BF00317241
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although the importance of pollinators has most often been examined in the evolution of floral characters, seed predators may also play a role in shaping floral evolution. In this study, I examined the role of interplant distance, plant size, and flower morphology on Ipomopsis aggregatás (Polemoniaceae) attractiveness to a pre-dispersal seed predator, Hylemya sp. (Anthomyiidae) and to hummingbird pollinators. The attractiveness of I. aggregata individuals to Hylemya was nonlinearly related to interplant distance in experimental arrays. Clumped and highly dispersed plants were preyed upon more frequently than those at intermediate distances. I found no relationship between interplant distance and visitation rates by hummingbird pollinators in these experimental arrays. However, in natural populations studied, clumped plants were more frequently approached by hummingbirds than those growing more widely dispersed. Display size was unrelated to visitation by Hylemya on inflorescences I clipped and maintained as “large”, “small” and “control”. Display size was also unrelated to the total number of visits by hummingbird pollinators to each of these experimental plants, however “large” display plants were more likely to be visited first in any given visitation sequence. Of various morphological measurements, corolla length showed the strongest positive correlation with Hylemya egg presence. To the extent that plant spacing and morphology is correlated with pollinator visits and ultimate seed set, Hylemya could be choosing flowers optimally, and playing a role in the evolution of floral traits.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 1992

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