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Parallel processing strategies of the primate visual system

Parallel processing strategies of the primate visual system Multiple parallel processing strategies, involving over a dozen retinal ganglion cell types, can be found in the retina. Each ganglion cell type tiles the retina to provide a complete representation across the entire visual field of the visual attributes it conveys to the brain. Three retinal ganglion cell types have been particularly well characterized both anatomically and physiologically and project in parallel from the retina, through the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus to the primary visual cortex. The primary visual cortex receives parallel inputs from the thalamus and uses modularity, defined spatially and by cell type-specific connectivity, to recombine these inputs into new parallel outputs. Beyond the primary visual cortex, separate but interacting dorsal and ventral streams perform distinct computations on similar visual information to support distinct behavioural goals. Less is known about the parallel processing strategies that are used in the extrastriate visual cortex. However, there are strong indications that these areas use many of the same strategies that are found in the primary visual cortex. Many of the parallel processing strategies found in the primate visual system are also found in the other sensory processing systems of the mammalian brain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Neuroscience Springer Journals

Parallel processing strategies of the primate visual system

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References (177)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Neurosciences; Behavioral Sciences; Biological Techniques; Neurobiology; Animal Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1471-003X
eISSN
1471-0048
DOI
10.1038/nrn2619
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Multiple parallel processing strategies, involving over a dozen retinal ganglion cell types, can be found in the retina. Each ganglion cell type tiles the retina to provide a complete representation across the entire visual field of the visual attributes it conveys to the brain. Three retinal ganglion cell types have been particularly well characterized both anatomically and physiologically and project in parallel from the retina, through the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus to the primary visual cortex. The primary visual cortex receives parallel inputs from the thalamus and uses modularity, defined spatially and by cell type-specific connectivity, to recombine these inputs into new parallel outputs. Beyond the primary visual cortex, separate but interacting dorsal and ventral streams perform distinct computations on similar visual information to support distinct behavioural goals. Less is known about the parallel processing strategies that are used in the extrastriate visual cortex. However, there are strong indications that these areas use many of the same strategies that are found in the primary visual cortex. Many of the parallel processing strategies found in the primate visual system are also found in the other sensory processing systems of the mammalian brain.

Journal

Nature Reviews NeuroscienceSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 8, 2009

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