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Pathogens: raft hijackers

Pathogens: raft hijackers Key PointsLipid rafts are liquid-ordered membranes, enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, that can selectively incorporate or exclude proteins. This allows them to regulate many protein–protein and lipid–protein interactions at the cell surface.Lipid rafts function as concentration points for B- and T-cell receptor signalling, contributing to the adaptive immune response against pathogens. By organizing signalling downstream of Toll-like receptors, lipid rafts are also involved in the innate immune response.Despite the role of rafts in the activation of the immune system, many viruses, bacteria and protozoan parasites can use these host microdomains to infect target cells.Intracellular pathogens hijack host rafts to find gateways for entry into the cell, to create sheltered environments in which to replicate, to prevent host immune responses by taking over signalling pathways or to generate areas in which new pathogens can be assembled efficiently.Several pathogens, of which HIV and Epstein–Barr virus are well-studied examples, have strategies to subvert raft-associated signalling. This enables their efficient replication in immune cells while blocking the immune response that is elicited by the target cells.Molecular dissection of the mechanisms by which microorganisms hijack host raft domains will provide new therapeutic insights for the prevention and/or treatment of certain infectious diseases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Immunology Springer Journals

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References (123)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature Limited 2003
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Immunology
ISSN
1474-1733
eISSN
1474-1741
DOI
10.1038/nri1129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key PointsLipid rafts are liquid-ordered membranes, enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, that can selectively incorporate or exclude proteins. This allows them to regulate many protein–protein and lipid–protein interactions at the cell surface.Lipid rafts function as concentration points for B- and T-cell receptor signalling, contributing to the adaptive immune response against pathogens. By organizing signalling downstream of Toll-like receptors, lipid rafts are also involved in the innate immune response.Despite the role of rafts in the activation of the immune system, many viruses, bacteria and protozoan parasites can use these host microdomains to infect target cells.Intracellular pathogens hijack host rafts to find gateways for entry into the cell, to create sheltered environments in which to replicate, to prevent host immune responses by taking over signalling pathways or to generate areas in which new pathogens can be assembled efficiently.Several pathogens, of which HIV and Epstein–Barr virus are well-studied examples, have strategies to subvert raft-associated signalling. This enables their efficient replication in immune cells while blocking the immune response that is elicited by the target cells.Molecular dissection of the mechanisms by which microorganisms hijack host raft domains will provide new therapeutic insights for the prevention and/or treatment of certain infectious diseases.

Journal

Nature Reviews ImmunologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2003

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