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Perceived cognitive impairment in people with colorectal cancer who do and do not receive chemotherapy

Perceived cognitive impairment in people with colorectal cancer who do and do not receive... Purpose Cognitive symptoms are common after cancer, ease and 173 received chemotherapy (CTh+). At base- but poorly associated with neuropsychological results. line, groups did not differ on total FACT-COG, PCI, or We previously reported colorectal cancer (CRC) patients PCA scores. All scores, except PCA, were worse at had more cognitive impairment than controls. Here, we 6 months in CTh+. CRC patients not receiving chemo- explore relationships between cognitive symptoms and therapy did not differ from controls on FACT-COG do- neuropsychological domains. mains. PCA associated weakly (r =0.28–0.34) with Methods Subjects with CRC (N = 362) and 72 healthy attention/executive function, visual memory, and global controls completed neuropsychological assessments and deficit score. There was no association between PCI and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognition neuropsychological domains. Fatigue, anxiety/depres- (FACT-COG) at baseline (pre-chemotherapy) and 6, 12, sion, and poorer quality of life were associated with and 24 months. Associations between neuropsychologi- PCI and CogQOL (r =0.44–0.51) in CRC patients. cal and FACT-COG scores were explored: perceived Conclusions No association was seen between total FACT- cognitive impairment (PCI), perceived cognitive ability COG or PCI, and neuropsychological domains. A weak- (PCA), impact of PCI on quality of life (CogQOL). moderate association was found http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and Practice Springer Journals

Perceived cognitive impairment in people with colorectal cancer who do and do not receive chemotherapy

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References (16)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Oncology; Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Informatics; Quality of Life Research; Primary Care Medicine
ISSN
1932-2259
eISSN
1932-2267
DOI
10.1007/s11764-017-0656-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Cognitive symptoms are common after cancer, ease and 173 received chemotherapy (CTh+). At base- but poorly associated with neuropsychological results. line, groups did not differ on total FACT-COG, PCI, or We previously reported colorectal cancer (CRC) patients PCA scores. All scores, except PCA, were worse at had more cognitive impairment than controls. Here, we 6 months in CTh+. CRC patients not receiving chemo- explore relationships between cognitive symptoms and therapy did not differ from controls on FACT-COG do- neuropsychological domains. mains. PCA associated weakly (r =0.28–0.34) with Methods Subjects with CRC (N = 362) and 72 healthy attention/executive function, visual memory, and global controls completed neuropsychological assessments and deficit score. There was no association between PCI and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognition neuropsychological domains. Fatigue, anxiety/depres- (FACT-COG) at baseline (pre-chemotherapy) and 6, 12, sion, and poorer quality of life were associated with and 24 months. Associations between neuropsychologi- PCI and CogQOL (r =0.44–0.51) in CRC patients. cal and FACT-COG scores were explored: perceived Conclusions No association was seen between total FACT- cognitive impairment (PCI), perceived cognitive ability COG or PCI, and neuropsychological domains. A weak- (PCA), impact of PCI on quality of life (CogQOL). moderate association was found

Journal

Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and PracticeSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 27, 2017

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