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Phosphate Acquisition

Phosphate Acquisition Phosphate (Pi) is considered to be one of the least available plant nutrients in the soil. High-affinity Pi transporters are generally accepted as entry points for Pi in the roots. The physiological, genetic, molecular and biochemical analysis of phosphate starvation response mechanisms highlight the ability of plants to adapt and thrive under phosphate limiting conditions. These responses help them enhance the availability of Pi, increase its uptake and improve the use-efficiency of Pi within a plant. Enhanced ability to acquire Pi appears to be regulated at the level of transcription of high-affinity phosphate transporters. These transporters are encoded by a family of small number of genes having characteristic tissue and organ associated expression patterns. Many of them are strongly induced during phosphate deficiency thus providing plants with enhanced ability to acquire and transfer phosphate. In addition, plants also activate biochemical mechanisms that could lead to increased acquisition of phosphate from both inorganic and organic phosphorus sources in the soil. Furthermore, altered root morphology and mycorrhizal symbiosis further enhance the ability of plants to acquire Pi. Interestingly most of these responses appear to be coordinated by changes in cellular phosphate levels. It is becoming apparent that phosphate acquisition and utilization are associated with activation or inactivation of a host of genes in plants. In this article we describe molecular, biochemical and physiological factors associated with phosphate acquisition by plants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant and Soil Springer Journals

Phosphate Acquisition

Plant and Soil , Volume 274 (1) – Jul 1, 2005

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References (133)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Ecology; Plant Physiology; Soil Science & Conservation
ISSN
0032-079X
eISSN
1573-5036
DOI
10.1007/s11104-004-2005-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phosphate (Pi) is considered to be one of the least available plant nutrients in the soil. High-affinity Pi transporters are generally accepted as entry points for Pi in the roots. The physiological, genetic, molecular and biochemical analysis of phosphate starvation response mechanisms highlight the ability of plants to adapt and thrive under phosphate limiting conditions. These responses help them enhance the availability of Pi, increase its uptake and improve the use-efficiency of Pi within a plant. Enhanced ability to acquire Pi appears to be regulated at the level of transcription of high-affinity phosphate transporters. These transporters are encoded by a family of small number of genes having characteristic tissue and organ associated expression patterns. Many of them are strongly induced during phosphate deficiency thus providing plants with enhanced ability to acquire and transfer phosphate. In addition, plants also activate biochemical mechanisms that could lead to increased acquisition of phosphate from both inorganic and organic phosphorus sources in the soil. Furthermore, altered root morphology and mycorrhizal symbiosis further enhance the ability of plants to acquire Pi. Interestingly most of these responses appear to be coordinated by changes in cellular phosphate levels. It is becoming apparent that phosphate acquisition and utilization are associated with activation or inactivation of a host of genes in plants. In this article we describe molecular, biochemical and physiological factors associated with phosphate acquisition by plants.

Journal

Plant and SoilSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2005

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