Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Population structure and regeneration patterns of tree species in climate-sensitive subalpine forests of Indian western Himalaya

Population structure and regeneration patterns of tree species in climate-sensitive subalpine... The population structure of tree species has been explored in order to elucidate regeneration potential of the subalpine forests of Indian western Himalaya. For this study, the subalpine forest area was divided into three strata, i.e., lower altitude (<3000 m); mid-altitude (3000–3200 m); and high altitude (>3200m). Considering the major compositional attributes, an increase in altitude came with a significant decline in tree density and the total basal area for all the sites. However, no such clear trends were observed for recruits (i.e., seedlings and saplings). Seedling density did not exhibit uniform patterns for sites and altitude strata. In general, overall seedling density was greater at the Pindari site compared to the Lata and Tungnath sites. By comparison, significant variation in seedling density along the altitude strata was recorded for the Tungnath and Pindari sites only. Likewise, sapling density patterns varied across the sites and altitude strata, and significant variation in sapling density along the altitude strata was recorded only for the Lata site. At the Pindari site, the continuous increase in sapling density along with increasing altitude was revealing. The Pindari forests of exhibited expanding population structure. In contrast, greater accumulation of individuals in the sapling class and sharp decline toward both higher tree classes and lower seedling classes was generally apparent for the Lata and Tungnath sites. This indicates that the replacement in tree size classes from sapling stage is not proportional and the population may decline in the long-term. Considerable variation in patterns of forest and dominant species population structure were evident across altitude strata. But in all cases irrespective of sites, we found growth at the high-altitude stratum, in the form of entire forests or dominant species. This trend deserves further investigation to explore its relevance under changing climate scenarios. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Forestry Research Springer Journals

Population structure and regeneration patterns of tree species in climate-sensitive subalpine forests of Indian western Himalaya

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/population-structure-and-regeneration-patterns-of-tree-species-in-ope7teMNfs

References (54)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Life Sciences; Forestry
ISSN
1007-662X
eISSN
1993-0607
DOI
10.1007/s11676-014-0463-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The population structure of tree species has been explored in order to elucidate regeneration potential of the subalpine forests of Indian western Himalaya. For this study, the subalpine forest area was divided into three strata, i.e., lower altitude (<3000 m); mid-altitude (3000–3200 m); and high altitude (>3200m). Considering the major compositional attributes, an increase in altitude came with a significant decline in tree density and the total basal area for all the sites. However, no such clear trends were observed for recruits (i.e., seedlings and saplings). Seedling density did not exhibit uniform patterns for sites and altitude strata. In general, overall seedling density was greater at the Pindari site compared to the Lata and Tungnath sites. By comparison, significant variation in seedling density along the altitude strata was recorded for the Tungnath and Pindari sites only. Likewise, sapling density patterns varied across the sites and altitude strata, and significant variation in sapling density along the altitude strata was recorded only for the Lata site. At the Pindari site, the continuous increase in sapling density along with increasing altitude was revealing. The Pindari forests of exhibited expanding population structure. In contrast, greater accumulation of individuals in the sapling class and sharp decline toward both higher tree classes and lower seedling classes was generally apparent for the Lata and Tungnath sites. This indicates that the replacement in tree size classes from sapling stage is not proportional and the population may decline in the long-term. Considerable variation in patterns of forest and dominant species population structure were evident across altitude strata. But in all cases irrespective of sites, we found growth at the high-altitude stratum, in the form of entire forests or dominant species. This trend deserves further investigation to explore its relevance under changing climate scenarios.

Journal

Journal of Forestry ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 30, 2014

There are no references for this article.