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Rapid evolutionary innovation during an Archaean genetic expansion

Rapid evolutionary innovation during an Archaean genetic expansion Hidden in the modern-day genomes of today's living organisms are the imprints of ancient biogeochemical events. Lawrence David and Eric Alm have developed a new algorithm designed to reconstruct ancient genomes, taking into account the confounding effects of horizontal gene transfer and phylogenetic uncertainty. Applying this to around 100,000 gene sequences from present-day organisms, they find the genetic imprints of major events in Earth's history, including the gradual rise of oxygen starting more than 2.5 billion years ago, and a previously unreported brief but massive expansion in genetic diversity in the Archaean, more than 2 billion years before the Cambrian explosion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Rapid evolutionary innovation during an Archaean genetic expansion

Nature , Volume 469 (7328) – Dec 19, 2010

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References (33)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/nature09649
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hidden in the modern-day genomes of today's living organisms are the imprints of ancient biogeochemical events. Lawrence David and Eric Alm have developed a new algorithm designed to reconstruct ancient genomes, taking into account the confounding effects of horizontal gene transfer and phylogenetic uncertainty. Applying this to around 100,000 gene sequences from present-day organisms, they find the genetic imprints of major events in Earth's history, including the gradual rise of oxygen starting more than 2.5 billion years ago, and a previously unreported brief but massive expansion in genetic diversity in the Archaean, more than 2 billion years before the Cambrian explosion.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 19, 2010

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