Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

School Gardening for Little Children

School Gardening for Little Children THE value of any particular scheme of education for little children depends more on the interest the teacher feels in the subject, and on the sympathy he or she is able to manifest towards the pupils, than on the scheme itself. We think this will be obvious to anyone who peruses the pages of the volume before us. Most children bred in the country have a “garden all to themselves,” but we doubt whether any permanent benefit is derived by them unless their work in it is directed with sympathetic intelligence such as is revealed in Miss Latter's pages. “I have tried,” says the author, “to prove that it is possible to make nature-teaching the central point of the life of a school without detriment to the children; that such teaching gives a real meaning and incentive to all the handwork and leads to a richer and truer appreciation of poetry, pictures and music. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

School Gardening for Little Children

Nature , Volume 74 (1921) – Aug 23, 1906

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/school-gardening-for-little-children-hgfRBwWWDK

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1906 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/074411b0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE value of any particular scheme of education for little children depends more on the interest the teacher feels in the subject, and on the sympathy he or she is able to manifest towards the pupils, than on the scheme itself. We think this will be obvious to anyone who peruses the pages of the volume before us. Most children bred in the country have a “garden all to themselves,” but we doubt whether any permanent benefit is derived by them unless their work in it is directed with sympathetic intelligence such as is revealed in Miss Latter's pages. “I have tried,” says the author, “to prove that it is possible to make nature-teaching the central point of the life of a school without detriment to the children; that such teaching gives a real meaning and incentive to all the handwork and leads to a richer and truer appreciation of poetry, pictures and music.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 23, 1906

There are no references for this article.