Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Single institution experience treating 104 vestibular schwannomas with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery

Single institution experience treating 104 vestibular schwannomas with fractionated stereotactic... The pupose of this study is to assess the long-term outcome and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for 100 vestibular schwannomas treated at a single institution. From 1993 to 2007, 104 patients underwent were treated with radiation therapy for vestibular schwannoma. Forty-eight patients received SRS, with a median prescription dose of 12.5 Gy for SRS (range 9.7–16 Gy). For FSRT, two different fraction schedules were employed: a conventional schedule (ConFSRT) of 1.8 Gy per fraction (Gy/F) for 25 or 28 fractions to a total dose of 45 or 50.4 Gy (n = 19); and a once weekly hypofractionated course (HypoFSRT) consisting of 4 Gy/F for 5 fractions to a total dose of 20 Gy (n = 37). Patients treated with FSRT had better baseline hearing, facial, and trigeminal nerve function, and were more likely to have a diagnosis of NF2. The 5-year progression free rate (PFR) was 97.0 after SRS, 90.5 % after HypoFSRT, and 100.0 % after ConFSRT (p = NS). Univariate analysis demonstrated that NF2 and larger tumor size (greater than the median) correlated with poorer local control, but prior surgical resection did not. Serviceable hearing was preserved in 60.0 % of SRS patients, 63.2 % of HypoFSRT patients, and 44.4 % of ConFSRT patients (p = 0.6). Similarly, there were no significant differences in 5-year rates of trigeminal toxicity facial nerve toxicity, vestibular dysfunction, or tinnitus. Conclusions:Equivalent 5-year PFR and toxicity rates are shown for patients with vestibular schwanoma selected for SRS, HypoFSRT, and ConFSRT after multidisciplinary evaluation. Factors correlating with tumor progression included NF2 and larger tumor size. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neuro-Oncology Springer Journals

Single institution experience treating 104 vestibular schwannomas with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/single-institution-experience-treating-104-vestibular-schwannomas-with-kL7h9FDOoW

References (20)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Oncology; Neurology
ISSN
0167-594X
eISSN
1573-7373
DOI
10.1007/s11060-013-1282-4
pmid
24142200
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The pupose of this study is to assess the long-term outcome and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for 100 vestibular schwannomas treated at a single institution. From 1993 to 2007, 104 patients underwent were treated with radiation therapy for vestibular schwannoma. Forty-eight patients received SRS, with a median prescription dose of 12.5 Gy for SRS (range 9.7–16 Gy). For FSRT, two different fraction schedules were employed: a conventional schedule (ConFSRT) of 1.8 Gy per fraction (Gy/F) for 25 or 28 fractions to a total dose of 45 or 50.4 Gy (n = 19); and a once weekly hypofractionated course (HypoFSRT) consisting of 4 Gy/F for 5 fractions to a total dose of 20 Gy (n = 37). Patients treated with FSRT had better baseline hearing, facial, and trigeminal nerve function, and were more likely to have a diagnosis of NF2. The 5-year progression free rate (PFR) was 97.0 after SRS, 90.5 % after HypoFSRT, and 100.0 % after ConFSRT (p = NS). Univariate analysis demonstrated that NF2 and larger tumor size (greater than the median) correlated with poorer local control, but prior surgical resection did not. Serviceable hearing was preserved in 60.0 % of SRS patients, 63.2 % of HypoFSRT patients, and 44.4 % of ConFSRT patients (p = 0.6). Similarly, there were no significant differences in 5-year rates of trigeminal toxicity facial nerve toxicity, vestibular dysfunction, or tinnitus. Conclusions:Equivalent 5-year PFR and toxicity rates are shown for patients with vestibular schwanoma selected for SRS, HypoFSRT, and ConFSRT after multidisciplinary evaluation. Factors correlating with tumor progression included NF2 and larger tumor size.

Journal

Journal of Neuro-OncologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 20, 2013

There are no references for this article.