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Soviet Space CultureSpace Exploration in Russian and Western Popular Culture

Soviet Space Culture: Space Exploration in Russian and Western Popular Culture [This chapter contains a comparative examination of a comprehensive selection of fictional representations of space exploration in search of their main recurrent and specific features. It has been conducted on the assumption that such representations, frequently stimulated by the secretive and at times disingenuous nature of the official outer space discourse, provide a revealing counter-narrative to this discourse, tapping into common and widespread hopes and fears associated with the space conquest. In my analysis, I have chosen to focus on two media created to reach the widest audience possible and thus achieve a maximum impact, the popular song and the motion picture, because their bid for a mass appeal inevitably feeds off, shapes up and uncovers the relevant patterns of collective consciousness. (Regrettably, the word limit precludes me from a discussion of the genre of television science fiction series.) Chronologically, prominence will be given to songs and films from the early 1960s to the present. Occasionally, however, I shall be referring to the films that had pictured interplanetary travel long before manned space missions became a reality, and therefore had also contributed to the narrative in question. My approach to the cultural artefacts at hand combines various techniques of interpretative textual analysis with elements of content analysis in an attempt to detect the artefacts’ messages, identify their (ir)regular traits and relate them to the public perception of the ‘man in space’ phenomenon. The artefacts’ thematic commonality is given preference over the negligible differences determined by their genre.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Soviet Space CultureSpace Exploration in Russian and Western Popular Culture

Editors: Maurer, Eva; Richers, Julia; Rüthers, Monica; Scheide, Carmen
Soviet Space Culture — Nov 22, 2015

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References (2)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2011
ISBN
978-1-349-32437-8
Pages
251 –265
DOI
10.1057/9780230307049_19
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter contains a comparative examination of a comprehensive selection of fictional representations of space exploration in search of their main recurrent and specific features. It has been conducted on the assumption that such representations, frequently stimulated by the secretive and at times disingenuous nature of the official outer space discourse, provide a revealing counter-narrative to this discourse, tapping into common and widespread hopes and fears associated with the space conquest. In my analysis, I have chosen to focus on two media created to reach the widest audience possible and thus achieve a maximum impact, the popular song and the motion picture, because their bid for a mass appeal inevitably feeds off, shapes up and uncovers the relevant patterns of collective consciousness. (Regrettably, the word limit precludes me from a discussion of the genre of television science fiction series.) Chronologically, prominence will be given to songs and films from the early 1960s to the present. Occasionally, however, I shall be referring to the films that had pictured interplanetary travel long before manned space missions became a reality, and therefore had also contributed to the narrative in question. My approach to the cultural artefacts at hand combines various techniques of interpretative textual analysis with elements of content analysis in an attempt to detect the artefacts’ messages, identify their (ir)regular traits and relate them to the public perception of the ‘man in space’ phenomenon. The artefacts’ thematic commonality is given preference over the negligible differences determined by their genre.]

Published: Nov 22, 2015

Keywords: Space Exploration; Space Flight; Outer Space; Space Programme; Conspiracy Theory

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