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Spontaneous recovery after extinction of a conditioned taste aversion

Spontaneous recovery after extinction of a conditioned taste aversion Four experiments examined whether or not spontaneous recovery could occur after extinction in the conditioned taste-aversion paradigm. After three extinction trials, spontaneous recovery was obtained over an 18-day retention interval (Experiments 1, 2, and 3). The effect was not due to changes in the unconditioned preference for saccharin over the retention interval (Experiment 2) or to an increase in a nonextinguished aversion over time, as indicated by tests with both the original, nonextinguished aversion (Experiment 1) and with a weaker one (Experiment 3). Spontaneous recovery was not obtained when extinction was overtrained (eight trials) and a 49-day retention interval was used (Experiment 4). However, saccharin intake at asymptote reached the level of baseline water intake, and not the highly preferred level shown by never-conditioned controls. Results of all four experiments suggest that extinction does not return an averted taste to the status of an unconditioned one. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Learning & Behavior Springer Journals

Spontaneous recovery after extinction of a conditioned taste aversion

Learning & Behavior , Volume 24 (3) – Dec 24, 2010

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References (31)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Psychology; Psychology, general; Neurosciences
ISSN
1543-4494
eISSN
1532-5830
DOI
10.3758/BF03198982
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Four experiments examined whether or not spontaneous recovery could occur after extinction in the conditioned taste-aversion paradigm. After three extinction trials, spontaneous recovery was obtained over an 18-day retention interval (Experiments 1, 2, and 3). The effect was not due to changes in the unconditioned preference for saccharin over the retention interval (Experiment 2) or to an increase in a nonextinguished aversion over time, as indicated by tests with both the original, nonextinguished aversion (Experiment 1) and with a weaker one (Experiment 3). Spontaneous recovery was not obtained when extinction was overtrained (eight trials) and a 49-day retention interval was used (Experiment 4). However, saccharin intake at asymptote reached the level of baseline water intake, and not the highly preferred level shown by never-conditioned controls. Results of all four experiments suggest that extinction does not return an averted taste to the status of an unconditioned one.

Journal

Learning & BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 24, 2010

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