Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Spontaneous recovery after Pavlovian conditioning with multiple outcomes

Spontaneous recovery after Pavlovian conditioning with multiple outcomes In four experiments using rats, a Pavlovian conditioned stimulus (CS) was paired with a positive outcome, either pellets or liquid sucrose. That outcome was then either omitted altogether or replaced by another outcome. Although performance to the CS deteriorated only when the outcome was omitted, both procedures resulted in the CS’s ability to evoke greater responding after the passage of time. These results suggest that a similar outcome-independent depressive process develops when a Pavlovian CS is paired either with nonreinforcement or with a different outcome; that process then appears to dissipate with time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Learning & Behavior Springer Journals

Spontaneous recovery after Pavlovian conditioning with multiple outcomes

Learning & Behavior , Volume 25 (1) – Dec 24, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/spontaneous-recovery-after-pavlovian-conditioning-with-multiple-gweVIa9sL9

References (13)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Subject
Psychology; Psychology, general; Neurosciences
ISSN
1543-4494
eISSN
1532-5830
DOI
10.3758/BF03199028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In four experiments using rats, a Pavlovian conditioned stimulus (CS) was paired with a positive outcome, either pellets or liquid sucrose. That outcome was then either omitted altogether or replaced by another outcome. Although performance to the CS deteriorated only when the outcome was omitted, both procedures resulted in the CS’s ability to evoke greater responding after the passage of time. These results suggest that a similar outcome-independent depressive process develops when a Pavlovian CS is paired either with nonreinforcement or with a different outcome; that process then appears to dissipate with time.

Journal

Learning & BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 24, 2010

There are no references for this article.