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Spontaneous recovery without interference: Why remembering is adaptive

Spontaneous recovery without interference: Why remembering is adaptive Spontaneous recovery from extinction is a reliable result of two ingredients, variable training outcomes and the passage of time. Accounts of the phenomenon, which have come to focus on interference at the level of memory retrieval, have been based on simple associative learning tasks. The present study was designed to determine whether a more complex task—one requiring spatial mapping, timing, and patch assessment—would be subject to spontaneous recovery. Results showed that spontaneous recovery (1) makes a robust appearance in such tasks, (2) does not require interference among conflicting memories, but instead (3) requires ready access to training memories, and (4) is closely modeled by the temporal weighting rule, a quantitative model of patch choice that prescribes how value is best assigned to variable resources (L. D. Devenport & J. A. Devenport, 1994). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Learning & Behavior Springer Journals

Spontaneous recovery without interference: Why remembering is adaptive

Learning & Behavior , Volume 26 (2) – Dec 24, 2010

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References (49)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Subject
Psychology; Psychology, general; Neurosciences
ISSN
1543-4494
eISSN
1532-5830
DOI
10.3758/BF03199210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spontaneous recovery from extinction is a reliable result of two ingredients, variable training outcomes and the passage of time. Accounts of the phenomenon, which have come to focus on interference at the level of memory retrieval, have been based on simple associative learning tasks. The present study was designed to determine whether a more complex task—one requiring spatial mapping, timing, and patch assessment—would be subject to spontaneous recovery. Results showed that spontaneous recovery (1) makes a robust appearance in such tasks, (2) does not require interference among conflicting memories, but instead (3) requires ready access to training memories, and (4) is closely modeled by the temporal weighting rule, a quantitative model of patch choice that prescribes how value is best assigned to variable resources (L. D. Devenport & J. A. Devenport, 1994).

Journal

Learning & BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 24, 2010

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