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Stage-specific mortality, fecundity, and population changes in Cassida rubiginosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) on wild thistle

Stage-specific mortality, fecundity, and population changes in Cassida rubiginosa (Coleoptera:... Cassida rubiginosa Müller (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), one of the most conspicuous defoliators of thistle weeds, is capable of severely damaging thistle leaves; however, populations rarely reach sufficient density for effective thistle control under natural conditions. To investigate the impact of natural mortality factors on C. rubiginosa populations, life table studies were conducted between 1996 and 1998 in Kanazawa, Japan. Egg mortality, mortality in early larvae, and lost fertility contributed strongly to total generational mortality in every year studied. Egg mortality was primarily attributable to parasitism by wasps of the genus Anaphes, and the impact of predation and egg inviability was small. Mortality factors that affected the larval and pupal stages were largely unknown. Under field conditions, females only realized approximately 8.1–13.7 % of their potential fecundity, varying from 36.0 to 61.4 eggs per individual. Since annual changes in lost fertility exhibited a similar pattern to those in generational mortality, fertility loss might be the key factor driving C. rubiginosa populations. These results suggest that reproduction is the most important process that determines the level and fluctuation of the C. rubiginosa population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Entomology and Zoology Springer Journals

Stage-specific mortality, fecundity, and population changes in Cassida rubiginosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) on wild thistle

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References (44)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by The Japanese Society of Applied Entomology and Zoology
Subject
Life Sciences; Environmental Management; Plant Pathology; Zoology; Entomology; Applied Ecology; Agriculture
ISSN
0003-6862
eISSN
1347-605X
DOI
10.1007/s13355-012-0143-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cassida rubiginosa Müller (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), one of the most conspicuous defoliators of thistle weeds, is capable of severely damaging thistle leaves; however, populations rarely reach sufficient density for effective thistle control under natural conditions. To investigate the impact of natural mortality factors on C. rubiginosa populations, life table studies were conducted between 1996 and 1998 in Kanazawa, Japan. Egg mortality, mortality in early larvae, and lost fertility contributed strongly to total generational mortality in every year studied. Egg mortality was primarily attributable to parasitism by wasps of the genus Anaphes, and the impact of predation and egg inviability was small. Mortality factors that affected the larval and pupal stages were largely unknown. Under field conditions, females only realized approximately 8.1–13.7 % of their potential fecundity, varying from 36.0 to 61.4 eggs per individual. Since annual changes in lost fertility exhibited a similar pattern to those in generational mortality, fertility loss might be the key factor driving C. rubiginosa populations. These results suggest that reproduction is the most important process that determines the level and fluctuation of the C. rubiginosa population.

Journal

Applied Entomology and ZoologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 25, 2012

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