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Subterranean RodentsMicroclimate in Burrows of Subterranean Rodents — Revisited

Subterranean Rodents: Microclimate in Burrows of Subterranean Rodents — Revisited Microclimate in Burrows of Subterranean Rodents – Revisited Hynek Burda, Radim Šumbera, Sabine Begall 3.1 Introduction The subterranean ecotope provides its inhabitants with several advantages. Burrowing (fossorial) mammals construct or visit existing burrow sys- tems regularly or temporarily for shelter but search for their food mainly above ground. Subterranean mammals confine their existence and foraging mainlytothe undergroundecotope,and thereisacontinuum from fossorial through facultative to strictly subterranean lifestyles (cf., e.g. Nevo 1979, 1999; Nevo and Reig 1990; Kinlaw 1999 for reviews). The shelter function of the underground ecotope has two components: protection from predators and protection from environmental fluctuation or extremes predominating above the ground. Protection is particularly important in periods of en- hanced vulnerability: during resting and sleeping, hibernation, aestivation, or breeding. On the other hand, the subterranean niche is highly special- ized and challenging. Burrow inhabitants are deprived of most sensory cues available above ground, and face low food supply, high energetic costs of digging and some stressful microenvironmental conditions as high hu- midity, low gas ventilation, hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions (Kennerly 1964; Arieli 1979; Contreras and McNab 1990; Nevo 1999). It is assumed that the subterranean niche opened to herbivores in the upper Eocene (45–35 million years ago http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Subterranean RodentsMicroclimate in Burrows of Subterranean Rodents — Revisited

Editors: Begall, Sabine; Burda, Hynek; Schleich, Cristian E.
Subterranean Rodents — Jan 1, 2007

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References (46)

Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007
ISBN
978-3-540-69275-1
Pages
21 –33
DOI
10.1007/978-3-540-69276-8_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

Microclimate in Burrows of Subterranean Rodents – Revisited Hynek Burda, Radim Šumbera, Sabine Begall 3.1 Introduction The subterranean ecotope provides its inhabitants with several advantages. Burrowing (fossorial) mammals construct or visit existing burrow sys- tems regularly or temporarily for shelter but search for their food mainly above ground. Subterranean mammals confine their existence and foraging mainlytothe undergroundecotope,and thereisacontinuum from fossorial through facultative to strictly subterranean lifestyles (cf., e.g. Nevo 1979, 1999; Nevo and Reig 1990; Kinlaw 1999 for reviews). The shelter function of the underground ecotope has two components: protection from predators and protection from environmental fluctuation or extremes predominating above the ground. Protection is particularly important in periods of en- hanced vulnerability: during resting and sleeping, hibernation, aestivation, or breeding. On the other hand, the subterranean niche is highly special- ized and challenging. Burrow inhabitants are deprived of most sensory cues available above ground, and face low food supply, high energetic costs of digging and some stressful microenvironmental conditions as high hu- midity, low gas ventilation, hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions (Kennerly 1964; Arieli 1979; Contreras and McNab 1990; Nevo 1999). It is assumed that the subterranean niche opened to herbivores in the upper Eocene (45–35 million years ago

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: Burrow System; Nest Chamber; Pocket Gopher; European Badger; Subterranean Rodent

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