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Systematic review of self-reported cognitive function in cancer patients following chemotherapy treatment

Systematic review of self-reported cognitive function in cancer patients following chemotherapy... Purpose Cognitive symptoms are common in cancer patients, with up to 70% reporting cognitive symptoms following chemo- therapy. These symptoms can have a major impact on how an individual functions in all aspects of their lives. This review evaluates self-reported cognitive function and its associations with neuropsychological tests and patient-reported outcomes in adult cancer patients who received chemotherapy treatment for a solid cancer. Methods A search of multiple databases (Medline, Ovid at Nursing, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine) from 1936 to 2017 was conducted, identifying 1563 unique articles, of which 101 met inclusion criteria. Results Of the 101 included studies, 48 (47%) were cross-sectional and 38 (38%) longitudinal in design, with 12 (12%) randomised controlled trials. A minority (26%) incorporated a healthy control arm in the study design, whilst the majority (79%) were in women with breast cancer. There was diversity in the assessment of self-reported cognitive symptoms. A total of 43 of 44 studies that sought an association between self-reported cognitive function and patient-reported outcomes found a moderate to strong association. Overall, 31 studies showed a lack of association between self-reported cognitive symptoms and neuropsychological results, whilst 14 studies reported a significant association between the two, but the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and Practice Springer Journals

Systematic review of self-reported cognitive function in cancer patients following chemotherapy treatment

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References (125)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Oncology; Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Informatics; Quality of Life Research; Primary Care Medicine
ISSN
1932-2259
eISSN
1932-2267
DOI
10.1007/s11764-018-0692-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Cognitive symptoms are common in cancer patients, with up to 70% reporting cognitive symptoms following chemo- therapy. These symptoms can have a major impact on how an individual functions in all aspects of their lives. This review evaluates self-reported cognitive function and its associations with neuropsychological tests and patient-reported outcomes in adult cancer patients who received chemotherapy treatment for a solid cancer. Methods A search of multiple databases (Medline, Ovid at Nursing, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine) from 1936 to 2017 was conducted, identifying 1563 unique articles, of which 101 met inclusion criteria. Results Of the 101 included studies, 48 (47%) were cross-sectional and 38 (38%) longitudinal in design, with 12 (12%) randomised controlled trials. A minority (26%) incorporated a healthy control arm in the study design, whilst the majority (79%) were in women with breast cancer. There was diversity in the assessment of self-reported cognitive symptoms. A total of 43 of 44 studies that sought an association between self-reported cognitive function and patient-reported outcomes found a moderate to strong association. Overall, 31 studies showed a lack of association between self-reported cognitive symptoms and neuropsychological results, whilst 14 studies reported a significant association between the two, but the

Journal

Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and PracticeSpringer Journals

Published: May 4, 2018

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