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T-cell regulation: with complements from innate immunity

T-cell regulation: with complements from innate immunity Key PointsThe complement system is necessary for the induction of optimal T-cell effector function. In complement component 3 (C3)-deficient mice, CD4+ T-cell responses to viruses are impaired and the optimal CD8+ T-cell responses are not induced.The complement system influences priming of T-cell responses by facilitating antigen-presenting cell (APC)–T-cell interactions. To carry out this task, APCs express various receptors for complement ligands.Deficiencies in complement components or receptor function hinder T-cell-dependent processes, whereas deficiencies in regulators lead to a more robust T-cell response. Alterations in this fine balance have a role in immune-mediated diseases.Complement regulators have a role in the controlled induction of T-cell apoptosis (and therefore the contraction of an effector response) by modulating apoptotic signals.Crosslinking of CD3 and the complement regulatory protein CD46 induces a regulatory T-cell phenotype in humans. These cells synthesize large amounts of interleukin-10 and granzyme B, through which these complement-induced regulatory T cells can inhibit effector T-cell proliferation and kill many types of activated, immunocompetent cells.There are substantial differences in the structure and expression profile of complement receptors and regulators between mouse and humans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Immunology Springer Journals

T-cell regulation: with complements from innate immunity

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References (116)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature Limited 2006
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Immunology
ISSN
1474-1733
eISSN
1474-1741
DOI
10.1038/nri1994
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key PointsThe complement system is necessary for the induction of optimal T-cell effector function. In complement component 3 (C3)-deficient mice, CD4+ T-cell responses to viruses are impaired and the optimal CD8+ T-cell responses are not induced.The complement system influences priming of T-cell responses by facilitating antigen-presenting cell (APC)–T-cell interactions. To carry out this task, APCs express various receptors for complement ligands.Deficiencies in complement components or receptor function hinder T-cell-dependent processes, whereas deficiencies in regulators lead to a more robust T-cell response. Alterations in this fine balance have a role in immune-mediated diseases.Complement regulators have a role in the controlled induction of T-cell apoptosis (and therefore the contraction of an effector response) by modulating apoptotic signals.Crosslinking of CD3 and the complement regulatory protein CD46 induces a regulatory T-cell phenotype in humans. These cells synthesize large amounts of interleukin-10 and granzyme B, through which these complement-induced regulatory T cells can inhibit effector T-cell proliferation and kill many types of activated, immunocompetent cells.There are substantial differences in the structure and expression profile of complement receptors and regulators between mouse and humans.

Journal

Nature Reviews ImmunologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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