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Takvatn Through 20 Years: Long-term Effects of an Experimental Mass Removal of Arctic Charr, Salvelinus Alpinus, From a Subarctic Lake

Takvatn Through 20 Years: Long-term Effects of an Experimental Mass Removal of Arctic Charr,... Between 1984 and 1989, the experimental removal of 31 tons (666 000 fish) of stunted Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, from Takvatn in northern Norway, had strong effects on the populations of Arctic charr, brown trout, Salmo trutta, and three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus. The littoral catch per unit effort (CPUE) of charr had decreased by 90% in 1990 and then increased to about 50% of the initial level by 1994 while the pelagic CPUE had decreased to zero. Growth in both charr and trout greatly improved when the charr density had decreased, and large fish of both species appeared in the catches. These large fish became predators on small charr in the littoral zone. The incidence of trout increased from below 1% to 15% from 1988 to 1999 after a brief peak at 30% in 1992 and 1993. The charr population attained a bimodal size distribution and did not return to the stunted state during the 10 years following the intensive fishing period. The mass removal experiment showed that it is possible to change the structure of a charr population by intensive fishing. Predation on small charr from cannibals and large trout was probably essential for maintaining the new population structure. An increase in the growth of young charr from 1995 to 1997 was related to a high consumption of Daphnia and Eurycercus. Rapid changes in the growth of charr followed the density fluctuations in sticklebacks, which show large annual variations in this system; the rapid changes in charr growth were probably caused by variations in the competition intensity for cladoceran prey between young charr and sticklebacks. Twenty years of data has provided important information, but even more time is needed to follow the long-term trends in northern lakes such as Takvatn. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Biology of Fishes Springer Journals

Takvatn Through 20 Years: Long-term Effects of an Experimental Mass Removal of Arctic Charr, Salvelinus Alpinus, From a Subarctic Lake

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References (22)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology; Animal Systematics/Taxonomy/ Biogeography; Environment, general; Nature Conservation
ISSN
0378-1909
eISSN
1573-5133
DOI
10.1023/A:1016062421601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Between 1984 and 1989, the experimental removal of 31 tons (666 000 fish) of stunted Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, from Takvatn in northern Norway, had strong effects on the populations of Arctic charr, brown trout, Salmo trutta, and three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus. The littoral catch per unit effort (CPUE) of charr had decreased by 90% in 1990 and then increased to about 50% of the initial level by 1994 while the pelagic CPUE had decreased to zero. Growth in both charr and trout greatly improved when the charr density had decreased, and large fish of both species appeared in the catches. These large fish became predators on small charr in the littoral zone. The incidence of trout increased from below 1% to 15% from 1988 to 1999 after a brief peak at 30% in 1992 and 1993. The charr population attained a bimodal size distribution and did not return to the stunted state during the 10 years following the intensive fishing period. The mass removal experiment showed that it is possible to change the structure of a charr population by intensive fishing. Predation on small charr from cannibals and large trout was probably essential for maintaining the new population structure. An increase in the growth of young charr from 1995 to 1997 was related to a high consumption of Daphnia and Eurycercus. Rapid changes in the growth of charr followed the density fluctuations in sticklebacks, which show large annual variations in this system; the rapid changes in charr growth were probably caused by variations in the competition intensity for cladoceran prey between young charr and sticklebacks. Twenty years of data has provided important information, but even more time is needed to follow the long-term trends in northern lakes such as Takvatn.

Journal

Environmental Biology of FishesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2004

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