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Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record The carbon dioxide generated underground by plants and microbes and released into the atmosphere — termed soil respiration — comprises the second largest terrestrial carbon flux. It has been suggested that the flow of CO2 from this source should change with climate, but this has been difficult to confirm observationally. Ben Bond-Lamberty and Allison Thomson use a two-decade database of soil respiration measurements to show that not only is soil respiration increasing over time, but also that this increase is strongly associated with temperature changes. They estimate that total global soil respiration is increasing by about 0.1% per year, implying a moderate sensitivity to air temperature. This is consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in recent decades. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

Nature , Volume 464 (7288) – Mar 25, 2010

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References (37)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/nature08930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The carbon dioxide generated underground by plants and microbes and released into the atmosphere — termed soil respiration — comprises the second largest terrestrial carbon flux. It has been suggested that the flow of CO2 from this source should change with climate, but this has been difficult to confirm observationally. Ben Bond-Lamberty and Allison Thomson use a two-decade database of soil respiration measurements to show that not only is soil respiration increasing over time, but also that this increase is strongly associated with temperature changes. They estimate that total global soil respiration is increasing by about 0.1% per year, implying a moderate sensitivity to air temperature. This is consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in recent decades.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 25, 2010

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