Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Arab Spring in the Global Political EconomyConclusion

The Arab Spring in the Global Political Economy: Conclusion [The aim of this book was to discuss the events of the Arab Spring within the context of traditional International Political Economy approaches to globalisation. More specifically, starting from a transnationalist IPE approach, a qualitative definition of globalisation was adopted (Mittelman 2000; 2004; Sassen 1988, 1991, 1996; Dicken 1998, 2003). From this standpoint, globalisation was defined as a qualitatively new phenomenon, whose main components have been represented by an unprecedented increase of foreign direct investment (FDI), the marginalisation of certain areas of the globe, including the MENA area, and the growing incapacity of the nation state to control its economy, territory and people (Van der Pijl 2011; Overbeek 1999, 2000; Cox 1981, 1996; Sassen 1996; Mittelman 2000: 25–26). While the parallel phenomenon of regionalisation, both de jure and de facto, allows some regions of the world to limit the disruptive impact of global restructuring by reconfiguring a new ‘spatial fix’ at the regional level, marginalised areas of the world are left with no further layers of governance above the nation state. As a result they face social unrest and political instability.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Arab Spring in the Global Political EconomyConclusion

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-arab-spring-in-the-global-political-economy-conclusion-E0XO08wHxf
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2014
ISBN
978-1-349-44482-3
Pages
228 –241
DOI
10.1057/9781137272195_9
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The aim of this book was to discuss the events of the Arab Spring within the context of traditional International Political Economy approaches to globalisation. More specifically, starting from a transnationalist IPE approach, a qualitative definition of globalisation was adopted (Mittelman 2000; 2004; Sassen 1988, 1991, 1996; Dicken 1998, 2003). From this standpoint, globalisation was defined as a qualitatively new phenomenon, whose main components have been represented by an unprecedented increase of foreign direct investment (FDI), the marginalisation of certain areas of the globe, including the MENA area, and the growing incapacity of the nation state to control its economy, territory and people (Van der Pijl 2011; Overbeek 1999, 2000; Cox 1981, 1996; Sassen 1996; Mittelman 2000: 25–26). While the parallel phenomenon of regionalisation, both de jure and de facto, allows some regions of the world to limit the disruptive impact of global restructuring by reconfiguring a new ‘spatial fix’ at the regional level, marginalised areas of the world are left with no further layers of governance above the nation state. As a result they face social unrest and political instability.]

Published: Oct 28, 2015

Keywords: Social Capital; Foreign Direct Investment; Civil Society; Political Economy; Middle Class

There are no references for this article.