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The behavioral regulation of monogamy in gibbons (Hylobates muelleri)

The behavioral regulation of monogamy in gibbons (Hylobates muelleri) Responses of mated individuals to playbacks of the songs of solitary females and males permit evaluating the behavioral mechanisms maintaining monogamy in gibbons. When female songs are played back from the centers of their ranges, mated female gibbons typically initiate duets and group approaches toward playback sites. Female songs played back from range boundary locations elicit duetting responses. Responses to solitary female songs do not differ from responses to song duets used by established mated pairs to mediate patterns of intergroup spacing. Mated males lead silent group approaches toward the sites of male song playbacks. These results suggest that range defense by female gibbons forces males into accepting monogamous mating relationships and that monogamy in gibbons is regulated by intersexually-supported, intrasexual aggression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Springer Journals

The behavioral regulation of monogamy in gibbons (Hylobates muelleri)

Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology , Volume 15 (3) – Aug 17, 2004

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References (18)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Behavioral Sciences; Zoology; Animal Ecology
ISSN
0340-5443
eISSN
1432-0762
DOI
10.1007/BF00292979
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Responses of mated individuals to playbacks of the songs of solitary females and males permit evaluating the behavioral mechanisms maintaining monogamy in gibbons. When female songs are played back from the centers of their ranges, mated female gibbons typically initiate duets and group approaches toward playback sites. Female songs played back from range boundary locations elicit duetting responses. Responses to solitary female songs do not differ from responses to song duets used by established mated pairs to mediate patterns of intergroup spacing. Mated males lead silent group approaches toward the sites of male song playbacks. These results suggest that range defense by female gibbons forces males into accepting monogamous mating relationships and that monogamy in gibbons is regulated by intersexually-supported, intrasexual aggression.

Journal

Behavioral Ecology and SociobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 17, 2004

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