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The “Big C”—stigma, cancer, and workplace discrimination

The “Big C”—stigma, cancer, and workplace discrimination Purpose Stigma and workplace discrimination have been iden- stakeholder groups regarding the existence and impact of stig- tified as prominent challenges to employment following cancer. ma in the workplace. While most provider and employer rep- However, there has been limited examination of how stigma resentatives believed survivors were not likely to be stigma- develops in work contexts and how it influences cancer survi- tized, cancer survivors themselves perceived cancer as a high- vors’ return to work process and their disclosure decisions. ly stigmatized illness in the workplace. Two inter-related ele- Methods In the broader study from which this paper emerges, ments were implicated in the development of workplace stig- we used an exploratory qualitative design to examine the return ma following cancer: (1) ongoing misconceptions and fears to work process (including workplace supports and accommo- associating cancer with death and (2) misperceptions regard- dations) of cancer survivors. We conducted 40 semi-structured ing impacts on the workplace, including survivors’ work abil- interviews with (i) cancer survivors (n = 16), (ii) health ities, productivity, reliability, the costs associated with their care/vocational service providers (n = 16), and (iii) employer continued employment (e.g., workplace accommodations), representatives (n = 8). We used thematic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and Practice Springer Journals

The “Big C”—stigma, cancer, and workplace discrimination

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References (94)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Oncology; Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Informatics; Quality of Life Research; Primary Care Medicine
ISSN
1932-2259
eISSN
1932-2267
DOI
10.1007/s11764-016-0547-2
pmid
27170116
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Stigma and workplace discrimination have been iden- stakeholder groups regarding the existence and impact of stig- tified as prominent challenges to employment following cancer. ma in the workplace. While most provider and employer rep- However, there has been limited examination of how stigma resentatives believed survivors were not likely to be stigma- develops in work contexts and how it influences cancer survi- tized, cancer survivors themselves perceived cancer as a high- vors’ return to work process and their disclosure decisions. ly stigmatized illness in the workplace. Two inter-related ele- Methods In the broader study from which this paper emerges, ments were implicated in the development of workplace stig- we used an exploratory qualitative design to examine the return ma following cancer: (1) ongoing misconceptions and fears to work process (including workplace supports and accommo- associating cancer with death and (2) misperceptions regard- dations) of cancer survivors. We conducted 40 semi-structured ing impacts on the workplace, including survivors’ work abil- interviews with (i) cancer survivors (n = 16), (ii) health ities, productivity, reliability, the costs associated with their care/vocational service providers (n = 16), and (iii) employer continued employment (e.g., workplace accommodations), representatives (n = 8). We used thematic

Journal

Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and PracticeSpringer Journals

Published: May 12, 2016

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