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The Energy Security-Climate NexusConceptualising Change and the PEPP

The Energy Security-Climate Nexus: Conceptualising Change and the PEPP [This chapter sets out the conceptual framework through which this book develops the analysis of UK energy governance change. As already noted, there has been a widespread perception within academic, government and wider circles that we have been living through a period of crisis in energy for much of the 2000s. Renewed emphasis has emerged in the UK, as elsewhere, on questions of international energy security, perceived often as insecurity of supply, alongside growing political traction behind arguments about climate change and the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Much of the debate about energy paradigm change centres on the argument that political change is required, but also despairs over the lack of change over time (Bernstein 2001; Carter 2001; Stanislaw 2004; Gonzalez 2006; Mitchell 2008). Furthermore, given the lack of precise definition within this debate of what might constitute a paradigm shift or, indeed, how this might happen, this chapter argues that clear conceptualisation is required.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Energy Security-Climate NexusConceptualising Change and the PEPP

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-45568-3
Pages
39 –63
DOI
10.1057/9781137307835_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter sets out the conceptual framework through which this book develops the analysis of UK energy governance change. As already noted, there has been a widespread perception within academic, government and wider circles that we have been living through a period of crisis in energy for much of the 2000s. Renewed emphasis has emerged in the UK, as elsewhere, on questions of international energy security, perceived often as insecurity of supply, alongside growing political traction behind arguments about climate change and the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Much of the debate about energy paradigm change centres on the argument that political change is required, but also despairs over the lack of change over time (Bernstein 2001; Carter 2001; Stanislaw 2004; Gonzalez 2006; Mitchell 2008). Furthermore, given the lack of precise definition within this debate of what might constitute a paradigm shift or, indeed, how this might happen, this chapter argues that clear conceptualisation is required.]

Published: Nov 4, 2015

Keywords: Conceptualise Change; Energy Policy; Energy Security; Interpretive Framework; Issue Area

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