Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Gravity of High-Skilled Migration Policies

The Gravity of High-Skilled Migration Policies Combining unique, annual, bilateral data on labor flows of highly skilled immigrants for 10 OECD destinations between 2000 and 2012, with new databases comprising both unilateral and bilateral policy instruments, we present the first judicious cross-country assessment of policies aimed to attract and select high-skilled workers. Points-based systems are much more effective in attracting and selecting high-skilled migrants than requiring a job offer, labor market tests, and shortage lists. Offers of permanent residency, while attracting the highly skilled, overall reduce the human capital content of labor flows because they prove more attractive to non-high-skilled workers. Bilateral recognition of diploma and social security agreements foster greater flows of high-skilled workers and improve the skill selectivity of immigrant flows. Conversely, double taxation agreements deter high-skilled migrants, although they do not alter overall skill selectivity. Our results are robust to a variety of empirical specifications that account for destination-specific amenities, multilateral resistance to migration, and the endogeneity of immigration policies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Demography Springer Journals

The Gravity of High-Skilled Migration Policies

Demography , Volume 54 (2) – Mar 13, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-gravity-of-high-skilled-migration-policies-cf90oEk0LV

References (100)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Population Association of America
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics; Medicine/Public Health, general; Geography, general
ISSN
0070-3370
eISSN
1533-7790
DOI
10.1007/s13524-017-0559-1
pmid
28290123
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Combining unique, annual, bilateral data on labor flows of highly skilled immigrants for 10 OECD destinations between 2000 and 2012, with new databases comprising both unilateral and bilateral policy instruments, we present the first judicious cross-country assessment of policies aimed to attract and select high-skilled workers. Points-based systems are much more effective in attracting and selecting high-skilled migrants than requiring a job offer, labor market tests, and shortage lists. Offers of permanent residency, while attracting the highly skilled, overall reduce the human capital content of labor flows because they prove more attractive to non-high-skilled workers. Bilateral recognition of diploma and social security agreements foster greater flows of high-skilled workers and improve the skill selectivity of immigrant flows. Conversely, double taxation agreements deter high-skilled migrants, although they do not alter overall skill selectivity. Our results are robust to a variety of empirical specifications that account for destination-specific amenities, multilateral resistance to migration, and the endogeneity of immigration policies.

Journal

DemographySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2017

There are no references for this article.