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The Impact of Climate Change on European LakesModelling the Formation and Decay of Lake Ice

The Impact of Climate Change on European Lakes: Modelling the Formation and Decay of Lake Ice [In northern and mountainous regions of Europe lakes are frozen in winter. The ice season can be up to seven months long and the thickness of the ice can reach 100 cm. The physical characteristics of the water under the ice are very different to that found in the open water. The ice cover stabilizes the thermal characteristics of the lake, the surface water is kept at the freezing point and there is very little vertical transfer of heat. In spring, solar radiation provides a strong downward flux of heat, the ice melts and any impurities contained in the ice are released into the water column. In small lakes, the covering of ice stops any transfer of momentum from the wind to the water body. In large lakes, the ice may break and give rise to some episodic movement. In shallow lakes the bottom sediment forms a significant store of heat that can influence their winter thermodynamics (e.g., Golosov et al., 2006). The volumetric changes associated with the formation of ice are of no consequence in deep lakes but in shallow lakes there may be substantial relative reductions in the volume of liquid water.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Impact of Climate Change on European LakesModelling the Formation and Decay of Lake Ice

Part of the Aquatic Ecology Series Book Series (volume 4)
Editors: George, Glen

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References (23)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010
ISBN
978-90-481-2944-7
Pages
63 –83
DOI
10.1007/978-90-481-2945-4_5
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In northern and mountainous regions of Europe lakes are frozen in winter. The ice season can be up to seven months long and the thickness of the ice can reach 100 cm. The physical characteristics of the water under the ice are very different to that found in the open water. The ice cover stabilizes the thermal characteristics of the lake, the surface water is kept at the freezing point and there is very little vertical transfer of heat. In spring, solar radiation provides a strong downward flux of heat, the ice melts and any impurities contained in the ice are released into the water column. In small lakes, the covering of ice stops any transfer of momentum from the wind to the water body. In large lakes, the ice may break and give rise to some episodic movement. In shallow lakes the bottom sediment forms a significant store of heat that can influence their winter thermodynamics (e.g., Golosov et al., 2006). The volumetric changes associated with the formation of ice are of no consequence in deep lakes but in shallow lakes there may be substantial relative reductions in the volume of liquid water.]

Published: Sep 25, 2009

Keywords: Outgoing Terrestrial Radiation; Slush Layer

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