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The impact of poverty on fertility in Peninsular Malaysia: A cohort analysis

The impact of poverty on fertility in Peninsular Malaysia: A cohort analysis The New Economic Policy (NEP) formulated in 1970 in Peninsular Malaysia had a two-fold aim of reducing poverty and redressing ethnic inequalities in wealth. The spatial bias of development on the west coast where the Chinese concentrate in the urban centres was also addressed. Population planning worked in tandem with NEP to reduce Malay to non-Malay differences in fertility. 1980 census data was evaluated to assess the impact of NEP on fertility transition in the country. Socioeconomic data for specific cohorts (15–24; 25–34 and 35–49) were collected and factor analysed to examine poverty conditions. The study found poverty to be differentiated by ethnicity. “Malay” poverty is high in both absolute (e.g. employment rate and education) and relative terms (as compared to the Chinese). The “Chinese” dimension is the exact opposite. Unfortunately, regional polarisation of wealth remains unchanged, even a decade after NEP. Poverty was regressed against cohort fertility and found to increase with it, especially for the older cohorts. Although NEP reduced fertility among the youngest cohort, its impact was not exceptionally large. The NEP is currently up for review. The apparent failure of the policy to achieve income equity and fertility transition must therefore be taken seriously. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GeoJournal Springer Journals

The impact of poverty on fertility in Peninsular Malaysia: A cohort analysis

GeoJournal , Volume 23 (2) – Jul 30, 2004

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References (36)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Social Sciences; Human Geography; Geography, general; Environmental Management
ISSN
0343-2521
eISSN
1572-9893
DOI
10.1007/BF00241397
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The New Economic Policy (NEP) formulated in 1970 in Peninsular Malaysia had a two-fold aim of reducing poverty and redressing ethnic inequalities in wealth. The spatial bias of development on the west coast where the Chinese concentrate in the urban centres was also addressed. Population planning worked in tandem with NEP to reduce Malay to non-Malay differences in fertility. 1980 census data was evaluated to assess the impact of NEP on fertility transition in the country. Socioeconomic data for specific cohorts (15–24; 25–34 and 35–49) were collected and factor analysed to examine poverty conditions. The study found poverty to be differentiated by ethnicity. “Malay” poverty is high in both absolute (e.g. employment rate and education) and relative terms (as compared to the Chinese). The “Chinese” dimension is the exact opposite. Unfortunately, regional polarisation of wealth remains unchanged, even a decade after NEP. Poverty was regressed against cohort fertility and found to increase with it, especially for the older cohorts. Although NEP reduced fertility among the youngest cohort, its impact was not exceptionally large. The NEP is currently up for review. The apparent failure of the policy to achieve income equity and fertility transition must therefore be taken seriously.

Journal

GeoJournalSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 30, 2004

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