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The need for many bridges

The need for many bridges AEJ 4:9–12 (2006) DOI 10.1007/s10308-006-0061-7 ESSAY Ali Alatas Published online: 4 April 2006 © Springer-Verlag 2006 At the height of the Cold War, global politics was dominated by the rivalry, both ideological and military, between the United States and its allies on the one hand, called the West, and on the other hand the then Soviet Union and its communist allies, called the East. It was a bipolar competition that was always threatening to break into nuclear holocaust at any moment. That precarious stalemate came to an end in the late 1980s and early 1990s with the collapse of the Soviet Union and its break-up into 15 new states. With the end of the Cold War, there was widespread hope that international politics would immensely improve. In many circles people imagined there would be no more ideological rivalries and there would be just one world of relative harmony. There would still be small wars in the developing world, but the greatest thing to fear would no longer be nuclear annihilation as the major challenge to global security. On the conviction that liberal capitalist democracy had triumphed for once and for all, Francis Fukuyama proclaimed the “end of history”. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia Europe Journal Springer Journals

The need for many bridges

Asia Europe Journal , Volume 4 (1) – Apr 4, 2006

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general; International Economics
ISSN
1610-2932
eISSN
1612-1031
DOI
10.1007/s10308-006-0061-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AEJ 4:9–12 (2006) DOI 10.1007/s10308-006-0061-7 ESSAY Ali Alatas Published online: 4 April 2006 © Springer-Verlag 2006 At the height of the Cold War, global politics was dominated by the rivalry, both ideological and military, between the United States and its allies on the one hand, called the West, and on the other hand the then Soviet Union and its communist allies, called the East. It was a bipolar competition that was always threatening to break into nuclear holocaust at any moment. That precarious stalemate came to an end in the late 1980s and early 1990s with the collapse of the Soviet Union and its break-up into 15 new states. With the end of the Cold War, there was widespread hope that international politics would immensely improve. In many circles people imagined there would be no more ideological rivalries and there would be just one world of relative harmony. There would still be small wars in the developing world, but the greatest thing to fear would no longer be nuclear annihilation as the major challenge to global security. On the conviction that liberal capitalist democracy had triumphed for once and for all, Francis Fukuyama proclaimed the “end of history”. The

Journal

Asia Europe JournalSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 4, 2006

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