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The Role of Non-Chemical Stressors in Mediating Socioeconomic Susceptibility to Environmental Chemicals

The Role of Non-Chemical Stressors in Mediating Socioeconomic Susceptibility to Environmental... Growing evidence suggests that lower socioeconomic position (SEP) communities may be more susceptible to environmental exposures. SEP, however, represents a complex mix of social and environmental exposures accumulating over the lifecourse, and those components that most impact susceptibility remain undetermined. One plausible hypothesis is that the chronic psychological stress associated with stressors in many lower-SEP communities (e.g., housing instability, food insecurity, fear of violence) may lead to altered immune, endocrine, and metabolic function. These alterations, together with environmental exposures, may ultimately contribute to increased risk of developing a variety of chronic diseases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Environmental Health Reports Springer Journals

The Role of Non-Chemical Stressors in Mediating Socioeconomic Susceptibility to Environmental Chemicals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Medicine/Public Health, general; Environmental Health
eISSN
2196-5412
DOI
10.1007/s40572-014-0031-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests that lower socioeconomic position (SEP) communities may be more susceptible to environmental exposures. SEP, however, represents a complex mix of social and environmental exposures accumulating over the lifecourse, and those components that most impact susceptibility remain undetermined. One plausible hypothesis is that the chronic psychological stress associated with stressors in many lower-SEP communities (e.g., housing instability, food insecurity, fear of violence) may lead to altered immune, endocrine, and metabolic function. These alterations, together with environmental exposures, may ultimately contribute to increased risk of developing a variety of chronic diseases.

Journal

Current Environmental Health ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2014

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