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The Tragedy of the Commons: Twenty-two years later

The Tragedy of the Commons: Twenty-two years later Hardin's Tragedy of the Commons model predicts the eventual overexploitation or degradation of all resources used in common. Given this unambiguous prediction, a surprising number of cases exist in which users have been able to restrict access to the resource and establish rules among themselves for its sustainable use. To assess the evidence, we first define common-property resources and present a taxonomy of property-rights regimes in which such resources may be held. Evidence accumulated over the last twenty-two years indicates that private, state, andcommunal property are all potentially viable resource management options. A more complete theory than Hardin's should incorporate institutional arrangements and cultural factors to provide for better analysis and prediction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Ecology Springer Journals

The Tragedy of the Commons: Twenty-two years later

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References (127)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Social Sciences; Anthropology; Environmental Management; Geography, general; Sociology, general
ISSN
0300-7839
eISSN
1572-9915
DOI
10.1007/BF00889070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hardin's Tragedy of the Commons model predicts the eventual overexploitation or degradation of all resources used in common. Given this unambiguous prediction, a surprising number of cases exist in which users have been able to restrict access to the resource and establish rules among themselves for its sustainable use. To assess the evidence, we first define common-property resources and present a taxonomy of property-rights regimes in which such resources may be held. Evidence accumulated over the last twenty-two years indicates that private, state, andcommunal property are all potentially viable resource management options. A more complete theory than Hardin's should incorporate institutional arrangements and cultural factors to provide for better analysis and prediction.

Journal

Human EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 11, 2004

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