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The use of external fixators in the immobilization of pediatric fractures

The use of external fixators in the immobilization of pediatric fractures The use of external fixation in the immobilization of diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures in children is still controversial, as these fractures are generally managed by immediate plaster casting, by traction followed by casting, by various methods of internal fixation, including the recently developed flexible rods, and by plating. Between 1982 and 1998, we treated 64 children with fractures of the long bones of the lower limb using external fixation, 44 of whom were available for follow-up (46 fractures). Their average age on the day of injury was 8.l years. Average follow-up extended for 4 years. The external fixation used was left in place for an average of 67 days. Full range of movement was achieved in 42 children (44 limbs). The longitudinal axis was anatomically correct (<5° angulation) in 40 children (42 limbs). Due to malalignment of the fracture (15° varus) in one child, tibial osteotomy was performed 4 years after fracture healing. There was no leg length discrepancy in 38 children, and shortening of >2 cm was measured in the fractured limbs of 2 children. We found the use of external fixators to be easy, quick, with a short learning curve, and appropriate for comminuted and closed fractures of the long bones, and especially for children with polytrauma. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery Springer Journals

The use of external fixators in the immobilization of pediatric fractures

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References (19)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Orthopedics
ISSN
0936-8051
eISSN
1434-3916
DOI
10.1007/s00402-001-0383-2
pmid
12228797
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The use of external fixation in the immobilization of diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures in children is still controversial, as these fractures are generally managed by immediate plaster casting, by traction followed by casting, by various methods of internal fixation, including the recently developed flexible rods, and by plating. Between 1982 and 1998, we treated 64 children with fractures of the long bones of the lower limb using external fixation, 44 of whom were available for follow-up (46 fractures). Their average age on the day of injury was 8.l years. Average follow-up extended for 4 years. The external fixation used was left in place for an average of 67 days. Full range of movement was achieved in 42 children (44 limbs). The longitudinal axis was anatomically correct (<5° angulation) in 40 children (42 limbs). Due to malalignment of the fracture (15° varus) in one child, tibial osteotomy was performed 4 years after fracture healing. There was no leg length discrepancy in 38 children, and shortening of >2 cm was measured in the fractured limbs of 2 children. We found the use of external fixators to be easy, quick, with a short learning curve, and appropriate for comminuted and closed fractures of the long bones, and especially for children with polytrauma.

Journal

Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 28, 2002

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