Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The viability of crowdsourcing for survey research

The viability of crowdsourcing for survey research Online contract labor portals (i.e., crowdsourcing) have recently emerged as attractive alternatives to university participant pools for the purposes of collecting survey data for behavioral research. However, prior research has not provided a thorough examination of crowdsourced data for organizational psychology research. We found that, as compared with a traditional university participant pool, crowdsourcing respondents were older, were more ethnically diverse, and had more work experience. Additionally, the reliability of the data from the crowdsourcing sample was as good as or better than the corresponding university sample. Moreover, measurement invariance generally held across these groups. We conclude that the use of these labor portals is an efficient and appropriate alternative to a university participant pool, despite small differences in personality and socially desirable responding across the samples. The risks and advantages of crowdsourcing are outlined, and an overview of practical and ethical guidelines is provided. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavior Research Methods Springer Journals

The viability of crowdsourcing for survey research

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-viability-of-crowdsourcing-for-survey-research-auuzXGNKDM

References (60)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Subject
Psychology; Cognitive Psychology
eISSN
1554-3528
DOI
10.3758/s13428-011-0081-0
pmid
21437749
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Online contract labor portals (i.e., crowdsourcing) have recently emerged as attractive alternatives to university participant pools for the purposes of collecting survey data for behavioral research. However, prior research has not provided a thorough examination of crowdsourced data for organizational psychology research. We found that, as compared with a traditional university participant pool, crowdsourcing respondents were older, were more ethnically diverse, and had more work experience. Additionally, the reliability of the data from the crowdsourcing sample was as good as or better than the corresponding university sample. Moreover, measurement invariance generally held across these groups. We conclude that the use of these labor portals is an efficient and appropriate alternative to a university participant pool, despite small differences in personality and socially desirable responding across the samples. The risks and advantages of crowdsourcing are outlined, and an overview of practical and ethical guidelines is provided.

Journal

Behavior Research MethodsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 25, 2011

There are no references for this article.