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Towards transplant therapy

Towards transplant therapy RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Nature Reviews Neuroscience Published online 19 Sep 2017 IN BRIEF NEURODEGENER AT IVE DISEASE The long-term safety and efficacy of using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons to replace midbrain dopaminergic neurons lost in Parkinson disease (PD) have not been tested in primates. Kikuchi et al. grafted human iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic progenitors into the putamen of macaques that had been treated with the toxin MPTP (which ablates nigral dopaminergic neurons). Three or four monkeys per group received vehicle or cells derived from healthy controls or individuals with PD. Cell transplants markedly improved neurological and movement scores at 12 months, and imaging and histological analyses confirmed that the grafts were tumour-free after as long as 24 months, supporting the utility and safety of this cell-based therapy. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Kikuchi, T. et al. Human iPS cell-derived dopaminergic neurons function in a primate Parkinson’s disease model. Nature 548, 592–596 (2017) VISU AL PROCES SING Face off How face patches — areas of cortex that process visual faces — develop is not known. Livingstone and colleagues reared three macaques for ~200 days without any visual exposure to faces and used functional MRI to measure neural responses to images of faces, objects and hands. Face-deprived monkeys did http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Neuroscience Springer Journals

Towards transplant therapy

Nature Reviews Neuroscience , Volume 18 (10) – Sep 19, 2017

Towards transplant therapy

Abstract

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Nature Reviews Neuroscience Published online 19 Sep 2017 IN BRIEF NEURODEGENER AT IVE DISEASE The long-term safety and efficacy of using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons to replace midbrain dopaminergic neurons lost in Parkinson disease (PD) have not been tested in primates. Kikuchi et al. grafted human iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic progenitors into the putamen of macaques that had been treated with the toxin MPTP (which ablates nigral...
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References (1)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Neurosciences; Behavioral Sciences; Biological Techniques; Neurobiology; Animal Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1471-003X
eISSN
1471-0048
DOI
10.1038/nrn.2017.120
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Nature Reviews Neuroscience Published online 19 Sep 2017 IN BRIEF NEURODEGENER AT IVE DISEASE The long-term safety and efficacy of using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons to replace midbrain dopaminergic neurons lost in Parkinson disease (PD) have not been tested in primates. Kikuchi et al. grafted human iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic progenitors into the putamen of macaques that had been treated with the toxin MPTP (which ablates nigral dopaminergic neurons). Three or four monkeys per group received vehicle or cells derived from healthy controls or individuals with PD. Cell transplants markedly improved neurological and movement scores at 12 months, and imaging and histological analyses confirmed that the grafts were tumour-free after as long as 24 months, supporting the utility and safety of this cell-based therapy. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Kikuchi, T. et al. Human iPS cell-derived dopaminergic neurons function in a primate Parkinson’s disease model. Nature 548, 592–596 (2017) VISU AL PROCES SING Face off How face patches — areas of cortex that process visual faces — develop is not known. Livingstone and colleagues reared three macaques for ~200 days without any visual exposure to faces and used functional MRI to measure neural responses to images of faces, objects and hands. Face-deprived monkeys did

Journal

Nature Reviews NeuroscienceSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 19, 2017

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