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What defines successful integration into a social group for hand-reared chimpanzee infants?

What defines successful integration into a social group for hand-reared chimpanzee infants? Hand-rearing of captive great ape infants is sometimes necessary but can have negative behavioral consequences. Modern hand-rearing protocols, including early integration into a diverse group of conspecifics, appear to reduce the negative consequences of hand-rearing, but the process of integration is not well studied. We investigated six potential metrics of success during the introduction of two hand-reared chimpanzee infants into a troop of nine other chimpanzees at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. Little aggression was observed and the infants continue to be maintained in the troop at publication. As we predicted, during the introduction the hand-reared infants showed consistent levels of stress-related behaviors, participated in affiliative interactions with all available partners, and acted, received, and mutually engaged in these interactions. Solitary behaviors by these infants were similar to a mother-reared infant in the same group. Each infant also formed a relationship with a specific female that involved nest-sharing, carrying, retrieval, and intervening to reduce risk to the infant; these relationships could be classified as allomothering because they involved maternal behavior but occupied significantly less of the infants’ time than a maternal relationship. Contrary to our prediction, the hand-reared infants therefore spent significantly less time in social behavior than a mother-reared infant of the same age. In addition, the hand-reared infants continued to show strong social preferences for each other as introductions progressed and to direct a low but consistent number of nonfeeding social behaviors to humans. The successful introduction of hand-reared infants appeared to involve adding conspecific social relationships to the infants’ social repertoire, but not eliminating social interactions directed at humans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Primates Springer Journals

What defines successful integration into a social group for hand-reared chimpanzee infants?

Primates , Volume 51 (2) – Nov 17, 2009

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References (35)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Japan Monkey Centre and Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology; Animal Ecology; Behavioral Sciences; Evolutionary Biology
ISSN
0032-8332
eISSN
1610-7365
DOI
10.1007/s10329-009-0176-8
pmid
19916071
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hand-rearing of captive great ape infants is sometimes necessary but can have negative behavioral consequences. Modern hand-rearing protocols, including early integration into a diverse group of conspecifics, appear to reduce the negative consequences of hand-rearing, but the process of integration is not well studied. We investigated six potential metrics of success during the introduction of two hand-reared chimpanzee infants into a troop of nine other chimpanzees at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. Little aggression was observed and the infants continue to be maintained in the troop at publication. As we predicted, during the introduction the hand-reared infants showed consistent levels of stress-related behaviors, participated in affiliative interactions with all available partners, and acted, received, and mutually engaged in these interactions. Solitary behaviors by these infants were similar to a mother-reared infant in the same group. Each infant also formed a relationship with a specific female that involved nest-sharing, carrying, retrieval, and intervening to reduce risk to the infant; these relationships could be classified as allomothering because they involved maternal behavior but occupied significantly less of the infants’ time than a maternal relationship. Contrary to our prediction, the hand-reared infants therefore spent significantly less time in social behavior than a mother-reared infant of the same age. In addition, the hand-reared infants continued to show strong social preferences for each other as introductions progressed and to direct a low but consistent number of nonfeeding social behaviors to humans. The successful introduction of hand-reared infants appeared to involve adding conspecific social relationships to the infants’ social repertoire, but not eliminating social interactions directed at humans.

Journal

PrimatesSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 17, 2009

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