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When West Meets East: Generalizing Theory and Expanding the Conceptual Toolkit of Criminology

When West Meets East: Generalizing Theory and Expanding the Conceptual Toolkit of Criminology This paper considers the ways in which established criminological theories born and nurtured in the West might need to be transformed to be applicable to the context of East Asian societies. The analyses focus on two theoretical perspectives—Situational Action Theory and Institutional Anomie Theory—that are located at opposite ends of the continuum with respect to levels of analysis. I argue that the accumulated evidence from cross-cultural psychology and criminological research in East Asian societies raises serious questions about the feasibility of simply transporting these perspectives from the West to the East. Instead, my analyses suggest that the formulation of theoretical explanations of crime that are truly universal will require criminologists to create and incorporate new concepts that are more faithful to the social realities of non-Western societies, societies such as those in East Asia and Asia more generally. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Journal of Criminology Springer Journals

When West Meets East: Generalizing Theory and Expanding the Conceptual Toolkit of Criminology

Asian Journal of Criminology , Volume 10 (2) – Nov 30, 2014

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References (64)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Social Sciences, general; Criminology & Criminal Justice; Social Sciences, general; Political Science, general; Law, general
ISSN
1871-0131
eISSN
1871-014X
DOI
10.1007/s11417-014-9197-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper considers the ways in which established criminological theories born and nurtured in the West might need to be transformed to be applicable to the context of East Asian societies. The analyses focus on two theoretical perspectives—Situational Action Theory and Institutional Anomie Theory—that are located at opposite ends of the continuum with respect to levels of analysis. I argue that the accumulated evidence from cross-cultural psychology and criminological research in East Asian societies raises serious questions about the feasibility of simply transporting these perspectives from the West to the East. Instead, my analyses suggest that the formulation of theoretical explanations of crime that are truly universal will require criminologists to create and incorporate new concepts that are more faithful to the social realities of non-Western societies, societies such as those in East Asia and Asia more generally.

Journal

Asian Journal of CriminologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 30, 2014

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