Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Where have all the teachers gone? The silent crisis

Where have all the teachers gone? The silent crisis VIEWPOINTS/CONTROVERSIES WHERE HAVE ALL THE TEACHERS GONE? THE SILENT CRISIS Richard Halperin and Bill R atteree A silent crisis is stalking the families of the world: the swiftly accelerating shortage of teachers worldwide who are qualified and available to teach present and future gener- ations of children. The phenomenon spares few countries, rich or poor, but strikes the developing countries hardest. A survey recently published by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), A statistical profile of the teaching profession (2002), shows that despite substantial progress in recruiting new teachers since 1990, demographic pressures and the need to reduce the high dropout rate of primary school pupils are making a chronic situation worse in many developing countries. A newly published UNESCO Policy Research Note estimates that from 15 to 30 million additional primary schoolteachers will be needed by 2015, three million in Sub-Saharan Africa alone. These shortages are threatening the ambitious goals to achieve Education for All (EFA) in all countries by 2015. Very few countries in the world escape the problem posed by an overall global flight from the profession both of teachers and of people who had seriously consid- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "PROSPECTS" Springer Journals

Where have all the teachers gone? The silent crisis

"PROSPECTS" , Volume 33 (2): 6 – Jun 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/where-have-all-the-teachers-gone-the-silent-crisis-U3w7u0R3hc

References (6)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers
ISSN
0033-1538
eISSN
1573-9090
DOI
10.1023/A:1023634627999
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VIEWPOINTS/CONTROVERSIES WHERE HAVE ALL THE TEACHERS GONE? THE SILENT CRISIS Richard Halperin and Bill R atteree A silent crisis is stalking the families of the world: the swiftly accelerating shortage of teachers worldwide who are qualified and available to teach present and future gener- ations of children. The phenomenon spares few countries, rich or poor, but strikes the developing countries hardest. A survey recently published by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), A statistical profile of the teaching profession (2002), shows that despite substantial progress in recruiting new teachers since 1990, demographic pressures and the need to reduce the high dropout rate of primary school pupils are making a chronic situation worse in many developing countries. A newly published UNESCO Policy Research Note estimates that from 15 to 30 million additional primary schoolteachers will be needed by 2015, three million in Sub-Saharan Africa alone. These shortages are threatening the ambitious goals to achieve Education for All (EFA) in all countries by 2015. Very few countries in the world escape the problem posed by an overall global flight from the profession both of teachers and of people who had seriously consid-

Journal

"PROSPECTS"Springer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.