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Why genes in pieces?

Why genes in pieces? Nature Vol. 271 9 February 1978 501 news and views A gene, a contiguous region of J?~A, OuR picture of the organisation of genes now corresponds to one transcnptton in higher organisms has recently under­ Why genes unit but that transcription unit can gone a revolution. Analyses of eukaryotic 1 10 corr~spond to many polypeptide chains, genes in many laboratories ~ , studies _of ID of related or differing functions. globin, ovalbumin, immunoglobuh~, Recombination now becomes more SV40 and polyoma, suggest that Ill pieces? rapid. Since the gene is spread ou~ ov~r a general the coding sequences on DNA, larger region of DNA, reco11_1bm~t1on, the regions that will ultimately be from Walter Gilbert which should be hampered m htgher translated into amino acid sequence, are cells by the inability of DNA molecules not continuous but are interrupted by to get together, will be enhanced. Further­ 'silent' DNA. Even for genes with no resealed by an RNA ligase. Even if RNA more if exonic regions correspond to protein product such as the tRNA genes processing is general, the presenc~ of functlons put together by splicing to of yeast and the rRNA genes in Dro­ infilling sequences can speed evolut10ny form http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Why genes in pieces?

Nature , Volume 271 (5645) – Feb 1, 1978

Why genes in pieces?

Abstract

Nature Vol. 271 9 February 1978 501 news and views A gene, a contiguous region of J?~A, OuR picture of the organisation of genes now corresponds to one transcnptton in higher organisms has recently under­ Why genes unit but that transcription unit can gone a revolution. Analyses of eukaryotic 1 10 corr~spond to many polypeptide chains, genes in many laboratories ~ , studies _of ID of related or differing functions. globin, ovalbumin, immunoglobuh~, Recombination now becomes more SV40 and...
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References (7)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/271501a0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nature Vol. 271 9 February 1978 501 news and views A gene, a contiguous region of J?~A, OuR picture of the organisation of genes now corresponds to one transcnptton in higher organisms has recently under­ Why genes unit but that transcription unit can gone a revolution. Analyses of eukaryotic 1 10 corr~spond to many polypeptide chains, genes in many laboratories ~ , studies _of ID of related or differing functions. globin, ovalbumin, immunoglobuh~, Recombination now becomes more SV40 and polyoma, suggest that Ill pieces? rapid. Since the gene is spread ou~ ov~r a general the coding sequences on DNA, larger region of DNA, reco11_1bm~t1on, the regions that will ultimately be from Walter Gilbert which should be hampered m htgher translated into amino acid sequence, are cells by the inability of DNA molecules not continuous but are interrupted by to get together, will be enhanced. Further­ 'silent' DNA. Even for genes with no resealed by an RNA ligase. Even if RNA more if exonic regions correspond to protein product such as the tRNA genes processing is general, the presenc~ of functlons put together by splicing to of yeast and the rRNA genes in Dro­ infilling sequences can speed evolut10ny form

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 1978

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